Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts Tagged ‘Cuba’

Spanish-American Filipino War Footage

The Spanish-American-Filipino War is the first US war that was filmed.  Here are a collection of short clips from the Library of Congress.

We may watch one or more in class.  Feel free to watch as many as you’d like.  For audience in 1898, footage of war was a major attraction.  However, not all the scenes are “actuality” footage, but reenactments by film companies–created, no doubt–to satisfy audience demands

Read Full Post »

The Last Nuclear Weapons Left Cuba in December 1962

Soviet Military Documents Provide Detailed Account of Cuban Missile Crisis Deployment and Withdrawal

New Evidence on Tactical Nuclear Weapons – 59 Days in Cuba

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 449
Posted December 11, 2013

Edited by Svetlana Savranskaya and Thomas Blanton
With Anna Melyakova

http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB449/1b%20beloborodov%20indigirka.jpg

Col. Beloborodov on board the Indigirka bound for Cuba, 1962 (photo courtesy of Beloborodov family and Michael Dobbs)

Washington, DC, December 11, 2013 – The last Soviet nuclear warheads in Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis did not leave the island until December 1, 1962, according to Soviet military documents published today for the first time in English by the National Security Archive at George Washington University (www.nsarchive.org).

At 9 o’clock in the morning on December 1, 1962, the large Soviet cargo ship Arkhangelsk quietly left the Cuban port of Mariel and headed east across the Atlantic to its home port of Severomorsk near Murmansk. This inconspicuous departure in fact signified the end of the most dangerous crisis of the Cold War. What was called “the Beloborodov cargo” in the Soviet top secret cables — the nuclear warheads that the Soviet armed forces had deployed in Cuba in October 1962 — was shipped back to the Soviet Union on Arkhangelsk.

According to the documents, Soviet nuclear warheads stayed on the Cuban territory for 59 days — from the arrival of the ship Indigirka on October 4 to the departure of Arkhangelsk on December 1. U.S. intelligence at the time had no idea about the nature of the Arkhangelsk cargo. Arkhangelsk carried 80 warheads for the land-based cruise missile FKR-1, 12 warheads for the dual-use Luna (Frog) launcher, and 6 nuclear bombs for IL-28 bombers — in total, 98 tactical nuclear warheads. Four other nuclear warheads, for torpedoes on the Foxtrot submarines, had already returned to the Soviet Union, as well as 24 warheads for the R-14 missiles, which arrived in Cuba on October 25 on the ship Aleksandrovsk, but were never unloaded. The available evidence suggests that the 36 warheads for the R-12 missiles that came to Cuba on the Indigirka also left on Aleksandrovsk, being loaded at Mariel between October 30 and November 3.

The question of tactical nuclear weapons — their number, their intended use, command and control procedures, and even the dates of their arrival and departure — has created many puzzles for students of the Cuban Missile Crisis for years since the planner of Operation Anadyr, General Anatoly Ivanovich Gribkov, revealed their presence in Cuba in 1962 at a critical oral history conference of American, Soviet and Cuban policymakers and scholars in Havana in January 1992, co-organized by the National Security Archive. In the last twenty years, numerous scholars have published on the issue, each introducing additional evidence and moving the debate forward step by step.[1]

Today’s posting brings together the most important pieces of evidence documenting the presence of tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba during the Missile Crisis — the most authoritative story so far based on documents. Although many of the documents included here were previously published in English by the Archive and by the Cold War International History Project, this posting includes three newly translated documents, never available before in English, which provide detailed accounts of the Soviet deployment of missile forces and nuclear warheads and the exact chronology of the deployment.

One of the new documents, a contemporaneous after-action report written in December 1962 by Major General Igor Statsenko, provides details of the deployment and withdrawal of the Missile Division (the R-12 and R-14 regiments and supporting personnel) under Statsenko’s command (Document 1). A second new document is the report written by Lieutenant General Nikolai Beloborodov (commander of the Soviet nuclear arsenal in Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis) in the 1990s, most likely on the basis of his own contemporaneous documents, which describes the delivery, deployment and withdrawal of all nuclear warheads, which were under his command (Document 2).

Former CIA photointerpreter Dino Brugioni takes pictures of FKR and Luna missiles in Cuba, 2002 (photo by Svetlana Savranskaya)

Former CIA photointerpreter Dino Brugioni takes pictures of FKR and Luna missiles in Cuba, 2002 (photo by Svetlana Savranskaya)

Both reports read as understated but pointed condemnation of the Soviet General Staff’s planning of the Cuban operation. Statsenko’s report describes shortcomings in initial reconnaissance and camouflage and ignorance of local conditions on the part of the Operation Anadyr planners. Beloborodov’s report points to difficulties with storing nuclear warheads in the tropical conditions, unanticipated transportation problems, and the camouflage issues. His report also reveals the fact that even as the Soviet Presidium was deciding to pull back the strategic missiles (ships carrying parts of Statsenko’s division turned around on October 25 rather than challenge the U.S. quarantine of Cuba), the Soviet support troops in Cuba were given orders to unload the tactical warheads from Aleksandrovsk, and did that during the nights of October 26, 27 and 28-because at that moment, the Soviets were planning to leave tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba. On the basis of these two reports and all other Soviet documents available today, the following chronology outlines the Soviet decisions relating to the tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba.

Brief chronology of Soviet tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba:

  • May 24, 1962 -original plan for Operation Anadyr included deployment of 80 FKR cruise missiles with nuclear warheads.
  • June 10-Operation Anadyr approved by the Soviet Presidium.
  • September 7-the “Pitsunda decision.” Khrushchev augmented the original plan by adding 6 nuclear bombs for IL-28 bombers and 12 short-range nuclear missiles for the dual-use system Luna/Frog.
  • October 4-Indigirka arrived in Mariel with 36 warheads for R-12, 36 warheads for FKR, 12 warheads for Lunas, and 6 nuclear bombs for Il-28s.
  • October 22-Presidium discussed the possibility of using tactical nuclear weapons in the event of an American invasion of Cuba.
  • October 23-Aleksandrovsk arrived in La Isabella with 24 warheads for R-14 and 44 warheads for FKRs.
  • October 26-28-Aleksandrovsk “partially” unloaded-warheads for FKRs were unloaded and sent to units.
  • October 30-Aleksandrovsk ordered back to Severomorsk still carrying the 24 warheads for R-14s, after probably loading the 36 R-12 warheads at Mariel harbor and departing November 3.[2]
  • November 2-Anastas Mikoyan arrived in Cuba as Khrushchev’s special envoy.
  • November 8-Mikoyan suggested transferring “all remaining weapons” to the Cubans after special training.
  • Nov 12-Khrushchev decided to remove the IL-28 bombers.
  • November 22-Mikoyan informed the Cuban leadership that all nuclear weapons would be removed from Cuba.[3]
  • December 1-all tactical nuclear warheads left Cuba on Arkhangelsk.
  • December 20-Arkhangelsk arrived in Severomorsk.

The original Soviet plan for Operation Anadyr, presented to the Presidium on May 24, 1962 and finally approved on June 10, in addition to the deployment of the R-12 and R-14 missiles, provided for the inclusion in the Soviet Group of Forces in Cuba of 80 land-based front cruise missiles (FKR) with the range of 111 miles (Document 3). In September, Khrushchev decided to strengthen the Group of Soviet forces in Cuba and augment the nuclear portion of the deployment with additional 12 tactical dual-use Luna (Frog) launchers with 12 nuclear warheads for them, and 6 nuclear bombs for specially fitted IL-28 bombers, although he rejected a Defense Ministry proposal also to add 18 nuclear-armed R-11 short-range SCUD missiles (Document 5).

The strategic missiles, R-12 and R-14, could only be used by direct orders from Moscow. To the best of our knowledge, Soviet commanders in Cuba did not have the physical capability to use them without the codes sent from the Center. However, there is considerable debate as to whether commanders of tactical weapons units had authority to launch their own nuclear warheads (Document 7). They certainly had the capability.

Initially, at the Havana conference in 1992, General Gribkov stated that such authorization was given by the central command in the event of a U.S. airborne landing in Cuba. He presented a draft order providing for such pre-authorization, but that order was not signed by Defense Minister Malinovsky. According to Gribkov and other Soviet participants of the crisis, such authorization was given by Malinovsky orally to commanders before their departure for Cuba. The cable sent later, on October 27, categorically forbidding Soviet military to use tactical nuclear weapons without an order from Moscow, shows that the Soviet Presidium was very concerned about an unauthorized use of tactical weapons (Document 11). This provides indirect support to the argument that it was the understanding of the field commanders that tactical nuclear weapons would be used to repel a U.S. attack on Cuba. Even if the official pre-authorization order was not signed by the Defense Minister, we can conclude that in all likelihood, tactical nuclear weapons would most definitely be used in a first salvo if U.S. forces had landed in Cuba. The Presidium discussion of October 22 shows that the Soviet top leadership envisioned this scenario as well.

After the most dangerous phase of the crisis was resolved on October 28, and Khrushchev promised to withdraw “the weapons you call offensive” from Cuba, the world rejoiced. However, the Soviet leadership knew better-almost 43,000 troops and all the nuclear warheads were still in Cuba. Now they had to negotiate their own Soviet-Cuban missile crisis. Khrushchev sent his right-hand man, Deputy Prime Minister Anastas Mikoyan, to Cuba to oversee the removal of the missiles, salvage the Soviet-Cuban friendship, and negotiate the future Soviet-Cuban military agreement.

U.S. low-level reconnaissance photo of Luna/Frog short-range missiles in Cuba, November 1962 (photo from Dino Brugioni Collection, National Security Archive)"

U.S. low-level reconnaissance photo of Luna/Frog short-range missiles in Cuba, November 1962 (photo from Dino Brugioni Collection, National Security Archive)”

When Anastas Mikoyan arrived in Cuba, in the course of his extensive conversations over three days, he informed the Cubans that all the weapons other than those specifically mentioned in the Khrushchev-Kennedy statements would be left in Cuba: “you know that not only in these letters but today also, we hold to the position that you will keep all the weapons with the exception of the ‘offensive’ weapons and associated service personnel, which were promised to be withdrawn in Khrushchev’s letter.”[4] The documents suggest, as of early November 1962, that the Soviet intention was to withdraw the offensive weapons (the strategic missiles), but keep a massive military base in Cuba and make no more concessions to the United States. All tactical nuclear weapons, IL-28s and the combat troops except missile support personnel would remain on the island. This position, however, evolved significantly in the dynamic days of the November crisis.

In his talks with the Cubans, Mikoyan gradually realized that this would not be an easy relationship. He was taken aback by the Cuban romanticism and their professed willingness to “die beautifully.” But at the same time, his priority was to keep Cuba as a Soviet ally. He thought perhaps the best solution could be to strengthen the Cuban defenses but not to keep a large Soviet base. On November 8, he proposed to the Presidium to gradually transfer all the remaining weapons to the Cuban armed forces after a period of training by Soviet military specialists (Document 13). Because none of the these tactical weapons were mentioned in the Kennedy-Khrushchev correspondence and because the Americans were essentially oblivious to their delivery to the island, at the time it seemed to him that it would have been the most natural and logical way to resolve the Soviet-Cuban crisis. He requested permission from the Central Committee to tell Castro regarding the future military agreement that rather than maintaining a Soviet military base, “the Cuban personnel with the assistance of our specialists will gradually start to operate all Soviet weapons remaining in Cuba. […] As these personnel become prepared, gradually the Soviet people will be replaced with the Cubans. Upon completion of a certain time period necessary [to master] the military technology, all Soviet personnel will be replaced by the Cuban personnel, and those Soviet experts in special areas, without whom it would be difficult for the Cuban army [to function] will stay with you and work here as advisers in such number and for such a period of time as necessary.” On November 9, Presidium member Gromyko in a cable approved Mikoyan’s new line for negotiations with the Cubans.

Just as soon as Mikoyan presented the idea to his Cuban hosts, Khrushchev decided to agree to the U.S. demand to withdraw IL-28 bombers, which created a new crisis with the Cubans, who now had good grounds to expect further Soviet concessions and unleashed their fury on Mikoyan. Trying to mend relations once again, the Soviet envoy repeated to his Cuban hosts that although IL-28s would be withdrawn, all other weapons would stay, that “Cuba’s fire power is very strong.[…] not a single other socialist country, if we leave out the Soviet Union, possesses such modern powerful combat weapons as you have.” In his conversation with Castro on November 13, speaking about the military agreement, Mikoyan stated: “I want to reiterate that very powerful defensive weapons remain in Cuba. We will be able to transfer them to you when the Cuban military officials become familiar with them. This military equipment is incomparably more powerful than any equipment that Cuba currently has. These are the most advanced weapons comrade Pavlov [Gen. Issa Pliyev, commander of the Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba] currently has. The CC CPSU’s resolution is to transfer them to you over the course of time.” Mikoyan added that “even with ground inspections, it is practically impossible to find the warheads.” (Document 14).

Over the next several days, the Cubans, from the Soviet point of view, started behaving even more erratically, making the situation more dangerous and unpredictable. Castro ordered the Cuban air defenses to shoot at low-flying U.S. aircraft and sent a message to the Cuban representative at the United Nations, Carlos Lechuga, that “we possess tactical nuclear weapons, which we should keep.” What became clear to Mikoyan during numerous conversations with the Cuban leadership is that the Soviets could not really control their Cuban ally, and that if they were going to maintain Cuba as an ally, they would need to accept the fact that the Cubans would not always follow the Soviet script and that in fact they would develop quite an independent foreign policy. In these circumstances, transferring nuclear weapons to such an ally would be too risky. The Soviets had to pull them back.

Mikoyan understood that it would be his task to reconcile his hosts to the loss of all the nuclear weapons which they were promised. He suggested this course of action to the Presidium in a cable written right after midnight on November 22. In that cable, he also proposed that as an explanation, he could tell the Cubans that the Soviet Union had an “unpublished law” that prohibited the transfer of nuclear weapons to other countries (Document 16). In the morning on November 22, Mikoyan received a cable with the Presidium’s approval of his proposal (Document 17). Mikoyan met with the top Cuban leadership to explain this decision during the long late night conversation on November 22. Castro tried to persuade Mikoyan to leave the tactical weapons in Cuba. The Cuban leader pointed out that the Americans were not aware of the presence of these weapons on the island, and that the Soviets did not have to keep a military base in Cuba but could train the Cuban military, as the initial agreement had stipulated. He said these weapons could be hidden in caves. He begged the Soviet representative to leave him the weapons that meant so much to the Cubans. But Mikoyan was not swayed by his arguments. The tactical warheads had to go home (Document 18).

On November 25, the Soviet support troops started pulling the warheads from the storage facilities to the port of Mariel and loading them on the Arkhangelsk. The loading was completed and the ship departed Cuba on December 1, 1962.

Previously declassified U.S. documents published by the National Security Archive show that U.S. intelligence did not detect any of the nuclear warheads in Cuba during the crisis — either for the strategic missiles or for the tactical delivery systems — and close examination of U.S. overhead photography by author Michael Dobbs established that U.S. intelligence never located the actual storage bunkers for the warheads. U.S. planners assumed the missile warheads were present in Cuba, but discounted the possibility — even after seeing the dual-capable Luna/Frog in reconnaissance photographs as early as October 25 — that tactical warheads were on the island or might ever be used. U.S. analysts completely mistook the FKR cruise missiles for the conventionally-armed Sopka coastal defense missiles, and never understood the likelihood that the U.S. base at Guantanamo would be smoking radiating ruin from an FKR nuclear warhead if the U.S. invaded. Thus the shock to former officials such as Robert McNamara when they heard from Soviet veterans during the historic 1992 Cuban Missile Crisis conference in Havana that tactical nuclear weapons had been part of the operation from the beginning.[5]

The National Security Archive has worked since 1986 to open Cuban Missile Crisis files in the U.S., the former Soviet Union, and Cuba, including the successful Freedom of Information Act lawsuit that forced release of the famous Kennedy-Khrushchev letters. The Archive’s publications on the Missile Crisis include two massive indexed collections of thousands of pages of declassified U.S. documents, two editions of a one-volume documents reader, the multi-volume briefing book for the landmark 2002 Havana conference organized by the Archive on the Missile Crisis, the 50th anniversary collection from dozens of overseas archives co-published with the Cold War International History Project, and most recently the inside account from the Soviet side by Sergo Mikoyan and Svetlana Savranskaya, which published the transcripts of the contentious Soviet-Cuban talks over withdrawal of Soviet weapons after most of the world thought the missile crisis was over.


THE DOCUMENTS

Document 1: Report of Major-General Igor Demyanovich Statsenko, Commander of the 51st Missile Division, about the Actions of the Division from 07.12.62 through 12.01.1962. Circa December 1962.

This contemporaneous after-action report, published here for the first time in English, provides invaluable detailed information on the deployment of the 51st missile division as part of the Soviet Group of Forces in Cuba. While the report describes the difficulties of the deployment, it also points to shortcomings of the General Staff planning for the deployment. The report shows how even in adverse circumstances, with part of the shipment of missiles and missile support troops interrupted by the U.S. quarantine, the 51st division deployed and assumed battle readiness ahead of schedule, and as the Cuban Missile Crisis reached its peak “on October 27th, 1962, the division was able to deliver a strike from all 24 launchers.”

Document 2: The War was Averted (Soviet nuclear weapons in Cuba, 1962). Memoir of Lieutenant General Nikolai Beloborodov, head of the Soviet nuclear arsenal in Cuba. Circa early 1990s.

This memoir-report was written by Nikolai Beloborodov in the 1990s, most likely on the basis of his own contemporaneous after-action report. It provides details of transportation, deployment and removal of nuclear warheads from Cuba. His report also reveals the fact that even as the Soviet Presidium was deciding to pull back the strategic missiles (ships with missiles started turning around on October 25 so as not to challenge the U.S. quarantine line), the Soviet support troops were given orders to unload the tactical warheads from Aleksandrovsk, and did so during the nights of October 26, 27 and 28 — because at that moment, the Soviets were planning to leave tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba. It is not clear from this report whether the warheads for R-12 missiles were loaded back on Aleksandrovsk before it sailed back to Moscow on November 3 but other evidence suggests that was the case.

Document 3: Memorandum from Malinovsky and Zakharov on deployment of Soviet Forces to Cuba, 24 May 1962. Translated by Raymond L. Garthoff for CWHIP.[6]

This is the original General Staff plan of Operation Anadyr presented to the Soviet Presidium on May 24 and finally approved by the Soviet leadership on June 10, 1962. As part of a large-scale deployment of the Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba, this plan provided for 16 ground-based front cruise missile launchers and five “special” nuclear warheads for each launcher — 80 in total — with a range up to 180 kilometers (111 miles).

Document 4: Memorandum from R. Malinovsky to N.S. Khrushchev. On the Possibility of Reinforcing Cuba by Air. 6 September 1962. Translated by Raymond L. Garthoff for CWHIP.

Defense Minister Malinovsky presented these proposals on expediting the shipments of weapons to Cuba and augmenting the deployment with additional tactical nuclear weapons. His proposal included adding 12 Luna/Frog launchers with nuclear warheads, 6 nuclear bombs for IL-28 planes, and 18 nuclear-armed R-11M missiles [Scud A with a range of 150 kilometers].

Document 5: Memorandum from R. Malinovsky and M. Zakharov to Commander of Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba, 8 September 1962. Translated by Raymond L. Garthoff for CWHIP.

After Khrushchev’s decision on September 7, Malinovsky and Zakharov sent a revised deployment plan to the Commander of the Soviet Group of Forces. The addition of Lunas and bombs for Il-28s was approved by the top leadership, but Khrushchev canceled the deployment of R-11s.

Document 6: Memorandum from R. Malinovsky and M. Zakharov to the Chief of the 12th Main Directorate of the Ministry of Defense.

Orders to the 12th Main Directorate-the unit of the Defense Ministry responsible for nuclear warheads-confirm the addition of 12 Luna warheads and 6 bombs for Il-28s to be shipped to Cuba.

Document 7: [Draft] Memorandum from R. Malinovsky and M. Zakharov to Commander of Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba on Pre-delegation of launch authority, 8 September 1962.

This memorandum, which was prepared but never signed by Defense Minister Malinovsky authorized local commanders in Cuba to make a decision to use tactical nuclear weapons in the event of a U.S. attack on Cuba if they could not establish contact with Moscow (a very similar pre-delegation policy was followed by the U.S. at the time). General Anatoly Gribkov, one of the principal planners of Operation Anadyr stated in 1992 that the memo reflected the oral instructions that commanders received in Moscow before their deployment to Cuba. The existence of this draft suggests that it was Malinovsky’s preferred option but Khrushchev probably had not approved it-therefore the memo was never signed. However, it is clear that Soviet commanders in Cuba had the capability to launch tactical nuclear weapons, and many of them subsequently stated that they had received pre-delegation instructions orally.

Document 8: Malinovsky Report on Special Ammunition for Operation Anadyr, 5 October 1962.

The Defense Minister’s report to Khrushchev about the progress of shipping of Soviet armaments to Cuba specifically states that Aleksandrovsk was fully loaded and ready to sail.

Document 9: Telegram from Malinovsky to Pliyev, 22 October 1962.

On the day that President Kennedy publicly announced the U.S. discovery of the missiles in Cuba and the U.S. quarantine, the Soviet Defense Minister orders the Commander of the Soviet Group of Forces to raise the level of combat readiness and prepare to repel a possible U.S. invasion with combined Soviet and Cuban forces but specifically excluding the missile forces (Statsenko) and all nuclear warheads (“Beloborodov Cargo”).

Document 10: Telegram from Malinovsky to Pliyev, 25 October 1962.

Malinovsky orders Pliyev not to unload the warheads for R-14s from the Aleksandrovsk and get the ship ready to sail back to the USSR. The telegram does not include any instructions regarding either the FKR warheads (they were unloaded and transferred to storage) or R-12 warheads (most likely they were returned to the Soviet Union on Aleksandrovsk).

Document 11: Telegram from Malinovsky to Pliyev, 27 October 1962.

Moscow issues strict orders prohibiting local commanders from using tactical nuclear weapons. This concern on the part of the central leadership gives indirect support to Gribkov’s argument that local commanders were instructed in the spirit of the September 8 memo-that in case of an American attack, they had the authority to use tactical nuclear weapons. Now Khrushchev wanted to make it very clear that under no condition were tactical nuclear weapons to be used.

Document 12: Telegram from Malinovsky to Pliyev, circa 5 November 1962.

The telegram instructs Pliyev that tactical nuclear warheads would most likely be left in Cuba under his control.

Document 13: Telegram from Mikoyan to CC CPSU and Gromyko’s response, 8-9 November 1962.

Anastas Mikoyan, who was negotiating the resolution of the Soviet-Cuban Missile crisis with the Cuban leadership, came to the conclusion that it would be inexpedient to keep a full-scale Soviet military base in Cuba. He proposed to the Soviet Presidium to gradually transfer all the remaining weapons to the Cuban armed forces after a period of training by Soviet military specialists–“the Cuban personnel with the assistance of our specialists will gradually start to operate all Soviet weapons remaining in Cuba.” He requested Presidium approval for him to present this idea to the Cubans. The proposal was approved in the telegram signed by Gromyko on the next day.

Document 14: Record of Conversation between A. I. Mikoyan and F. Castro, 13 November 1962.

In this conversation, the first one after Khrushchev decided to remove Il-28s from Cuba, Mikoyan was trying to assure Fidel Castro that the Soviet Union was not abandoning its Latin American ally and would make no further concessions to the United States. He informed Castro that the CC CPSU passed a resolution to leave all the remaining weapons in Cuba and to transfer them to the Cuban Army over time. The Cuban firepower would not diminish and it will retain powerful defensive weapons: “These are the most advanced weapons comrade Pavlov [Gen. Pliyev, commander of the Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba] currently has. The CC CPSU’s resolution is to transfer them to you over the course of time.” Mikoyan added that “even with ground inspections, it is practically impossible to find the warheads.”

Document 15: Telegram from Malinovsky to Pliyev, 20 November 1962.

This telegram orders Pliyev to load all tactical warheads on steamship Atkarsk and send them back to the Soviet Union. This might have been a draft cable, anticipating an imminent policy change, or there might be a mistake in the date, which was transcribed from an original that is not available. We know from Beloborodov that on November 22 all tactical nuclear weapons were still in Cuba, that they only started to be pulled to the Mariel pier on November 25 and that loading lasted till November 30. Also, they were loaded and shipped back to the Soviet Union on Arkhangelsk, not Atkarsk. This telegram was probably the basis of General Gribkov’s oft-cited assertion that all Soviet tactical weapons left Cuba on November 20, 1962.

Document 16: Telegram from Mikoyan to CC CPSU, 22 November 1962.

This telegram was sent by Mikoyan either right after midnight on November 22, or late in the evening on November 21 but put into his logbook as of November 22. Mikoyan was scheduled to have a meeting with the entire top Cuban leadership to discuss the future of the Soviet-Cuban military agreement. By this time, Mikoyan came to the conclusion that leaving tactical nuclear weapons in the hands of the Cubans was dangerous, so he requested from the Central Committee to approve his suggestion-to tell the Cubans that the Soviet Union had an “unpublished law” prohibiting transfer of nuclear weapons to third parties. Most likely, Mikoyan made up this “law” for the occasion, but it seems to have stuck as a precedent for future Soviet policy. The Presidium gave its approval next morning.

Document 17: CC CPSU additional instructions to Mikoyan, 22 November 1962.

This cable signed by Gromyko approves Mikoyan’s suggestion from the previous night and categorically states that he was to tell Castro and the top Cuban leadership that all tactical nuclear weapons would be removed from Cuba.

Document 18: Record of Conversation between A.I. Mikoyan and F. Castro, 22 November 1962.

This crucial conversation, which lasted over four hours in the evening of November 22 settled all the main remaining issues of the Cuban Missile Crisis-most importantly the fate of the remaining tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba. Mikoyan admitted that they were still in Cuba and that the Americans indeed had no idea that they were deployed, but that the Soviet Union decided to pull them back due to the “unpublished law” prohibiting the transfer. This memcon provides an extraordinary glimpse into the microcosm of the Soviet-Cuban relations and helps one understand the depth of Castro’s humiliation at the Soviet hands during the Cuban missile crisis. For him, the resolution of the crisis meant that he was abandoned by his Soviet ally and left to the mercy of the American imperialists-because the Cuban security now depended not on the powerful Soviet weapons but on the U.S. non-invasion assurances, which the Cubans were not inclined to trust.


NOTES

[1] See especially Raymond L. Garthoff, “New Evidence on the Cuban Missile Crisis: Khrushchev, Nuclear Weapons, and the Cuban Missile Crisis,” CWIHP Bulletin 11, pp. 251-262; Aleksandr Fursenko and Timothy Naftali , “The Pitsunda Decision,” CWIHP Bulletin 10, pp. 223-227; and Svetlana Savranskaya, “Tactical Nuclear Weapons in Cuba: New Evidence,” CWIHP Bulletin 14/15, pp. 385-398. The question of tactical nuclear weapons also gets detailed treatment in Sergei Khrushchev, Nikita Khrushchev: Rozhdenie Superderzhavy (Moscow: Vremya, 2010).

[2] There is a Malinovsky cable dated October 30 ordering the commander of the Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba to load the R-12 warheads on the Aleksandrovsk and send to Severomorsk; and the CIA retrospective in January 1963 of overhead photography of the Aleksandrovsk‘s movements placed the ship at Mariel on November 3, at sea on November 10, and back at Severomorsk on November 23 with “missile nose cone vans” on deck. (See Dwayne Anderson, “On the Trail of the Alexandrovsk,” Studies in Intelligence, Vol. 10, Winter 1966, declassified 1995, available at www.foia.cia.gov). Beloborodov’s account has Aleksandrovsk leaving Havana on October 30, but it is likely that he is referring to the order from Malinovsky.  Less likely is the possibility that the R-12 warheads may have remained for the Arkhangelsk to carry.

[3] In the Defense Ministry cables that were transcribed by Russian veterans for publication in 1998, one dated November 20 orders the commander of the Group of Soviet Forces to load all tactical warheads on “steamship Atkarsk“; but Beloborodov’s account specifically cites the Arkangelsk, not the Atkarsk, and the cables between Mikoyan and Moscow place the decision to withdraw the tacticals only on November 21 and 22. The Defense Ministry transcription may be misdated, or if the date is correct, perhaps the Ministry was already anticipating the political decision.

[4] Telegram from Mikoyan to CC CPSU, November 6, 1962 in Sergo Mikoyan, edited by Svetlana Savranskaya, The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Missiles of November (Washington and Stanford: Wilson Center Press and Stanford University Press, 2012), p. 344.

[5] See Raymond L. Garthoff, “The Havana Conference on the Cuban Missile Crisis: Tactical Weapons Disclosure Stuns Gathering,” CWIHP Bulletin 1, Spring 1992, pp. 2-4.

[6] In this document, the number of the missile division is given as the 43rd missile division, but in the military documents from the fall of 1962, the number of the division is consistently the 51st missile division.  Most likely, the number was changed when the division was reorganized in the summer, according to the General Staff directive of June 13.  Statsenko describes the radical reorganization of the division, which resulted in the situation where he only knew one regiment commander out of five, and 500 officers and 1000 sergeants and soldiers were replaced.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Revisando viejos archivos, encontré este ensayo sobre el expansionismo norteamericano que escribí hace ya varios años por encargo del Departamento de Educación del gobierno de Puerto Rico. Desafortunadamente,  el libro de ensayos del que debió formar parte nunca fue publicado. Lo comparto con mis lectores con la esperanza  que les sea interesante o útil.  

 La expansión territorial es una de las características más importantes del desarrollo histórico de los Estados Unidos. En sus primeros cien años de vida la nación norteamericana experimentó un impresionante crecimiento territorial. Las trece colonias originales se expandieron  hasta convertirse en  un país atrapado por dos océanos. Como veremos, este fue un proceso complejo que se dio a través de la anexión, compra y conquista de nuevos territorios

Es necesario aclarar que la expansión territorial norteamericana fue algo más que un simple proceso de crecimiento territorial, pues estuvo asociada a elementos de tipo cultural, político, ideológico, racial y estratégico. El expansionismo es un elemento vital en la historia de los Estados Unidos, presente desde el mismo momento de la fundación de las primeras colonias británicas en Norte América. Éste fue considerado un elemento esencial en los primeros cien años de historia de los Estados Unidos como nación independiente, ya que se veía no sólo como algo económica y geopolíticamente necesario, sino también como una expresión de  la esencia nacional norteamericana.

No debemos olvidar que la  fundación de las trece colonias que dieron vida a los Estados Unidos formó parte de un proceso histórico más amplio: la expansión europea  de los siglos XVI y XVII. Durante ese periodo las principales naciones de Europa occidental se lanzaron a explorar y conquistar  dando forma a vastos imperios en Asia y América. Una de esas naciones fue Inglaterra, metrópoli de las trece colonias norteamericanas. Es por ello que el expansionismo norteamericano puede ser considerado, hasta cierta forma, una extensión del imperialismo inglés.

Los Estados Unidos  experimentaron dos tipos de expansión en su historia: la continental y la extra-continental. La primera es la expansión territorial contigua, es decir, en territorios adyacentes  a los Estados Unidos.  Ésta fue  vista como algo natural y justificado pues se ocupaba terreno  que se consideraba “vacío” o habitado por pueblos “inferiores”. La llamada expansión extra-continental se dio a finales del siglo XIX y llevó a los norteamericanos a trascender los límites del continente americano para adquirir territorios alejados de los Estados Unidos (Hawai, Guam y Filipinas). Ésta  provocó una fuerte oposición y un intenso debate en torno a la naturaleza misma de la nación norteamericana, pues muchos le consideraron contraria a la tradición y las instituciones políticas de los Estados Unidos.

 El Tratado de París de 1783

El primer crecimiento territorial de los Estados Unidos se dio en el mismo momento de alcanzar su independencia. En 1783, norteamericanos y británicos llegaron a acuerdo por el cual Gran Bretaña reconoció la independencia de las  trece colonias y se fijaron los límites geográficos de la nueva nación. En el Tratado de París las fronteras de la joven república fueron definidas de la siguiente forma: al norte los Grandes Lagos, al oeste el Río Misisipí y al sur el paralelo 31. Con ello la joven república duplicó su territorio.

Los territorios adquiridos en 1783 fueron objeto de polémica,  pues surgió la pregunta de qué hacer con ellos. La solución a este problema fue la creación de las Ordenanzas del Noroeste (Northwest Ordinance, 1787). Con ésta ley se creó un sistema de territorios en preparación para convertirse en estados. Los nuevos estados entrarían a la unión norteamericana en igualdad de condiciones y derechos que los trece originales. De esta forma los líderes norteamericanos rechazaron el colonialismo y crearon un mecanismo para la incorporación política de nuevos territorios. Las Ordenanzas del Noroeste sentaron un precedente histórico que no sería roto hasta 1898: todos los territorios adquiridos por los Estados Unidos en su expansión continental serían incorporados como estados de la Unión cuando éstos cumpliesen los requisitos definidos para ello.

La compra de Luisiana

La república estadounidense nace en medio de un periodo muy convulso de la historia de la Humanidad: el periodo de las Revoluciones Atlánticas. Entre 1789 y 1824, el mundo atlántico vivió un etapa de gran violencia e inestabilidad política producida por el estallido de varias revoluciones socio-políticas (Revolución Francesa, Guerras napoleónicas, Revolución Haitiana, Guerras de independencia en Hispanoamérica). Estas revoluciones tuvieron un impacto severo en las relaciones exteriores de los Estados Unidos y en su proceso de expansión territorial.

Para el año 1801 Europa disfrutaba de un raro periodo de paz. Aprovechando esta situación   Napoleón Bonaparte obligó a España a cederle a Francia el territorio de Luisiana. Con ello el emperador francés buscaba crear un imperio americano usando como base la colonia francesa de Saint Domingue (Haití). Luisiana era una amplia extensión de tierra al oeste de los Estados Unidos en donde se encuentran ríos muy importantes para la transportación.

Esta transacción preocupó profundamente a los funcionarios del gobierno norteamericano por varias razones. Primero, ésta ponía en peligro del acceso norteamericano al río Misisipí y al puerto y la ciudad de Nueva Orleáns, amenazando así la salida al Golfo de México, y con ello al comercio del oeste norteamericano. Segundo, el control francés de Luisiana cortaba las posibilidades de expansión al Oeste. Tercero, la presencia de una potencia europea agresiva y poderosa como vecino de los Estados Unidos no era un escenario que agradaba al liderato estadounidense. En otras palabras, la adquisición de Luisiana por Napoleón amenazaba las posibilidades de expansión territorial y representaba una seria amenaza a la economía y la seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos. Por ello no nos debe sorprender que algunos sectores políticos norteamericanos propusieran una guerra para evitar el control napoleónico sobre Luisiana. A pesar de la seriedad de este asunto, el liderato norteamericano optó por una solución diplomática. El presidente Thomas Jefferson ordenó al embajador norteamericano en Francia, Robert Livingston, comprarle Nueva Orleáns a Napoleón. Para sorpresa de Livingston, Napoleón aceptó vender toda la Luisiana porque el reinició de la guerra en Europa y el fracaso francés en Haití frenaron sus sueños de un imperio americano. En 1803, se llegó a un acuerdo por el cual los Estados Unidos adquirieron Luisiana por $15,000,000, lo que constituyó uno de los mejores negocios de bienes raíces de la historia.

La compra de Luisiana representó un problema moral y político para el Presidente Jefferson, pues éste era un defensor de una interpretación estricta de la constitución estadounidense. Jefferson pensaba que la constitución no autorizaba la adquisición de territorios, por lo que la compra de Luisiana podía ser inconstitucional. A pesar de sus reservas constitucionales, el presidente adoptó una posición pragmática y apoyó la compra de Luisiana. Para entender porque Jefferson hizo esto es necesario enfocar su visión de la política exterior y del expansionismo norteamericano. Jefferson era el más claro y ferviente defensor del expansionismo entre los fundadores de la nación norteamericana. Éste tenía un proyecto expansionista muy ambicioso que pretendía lograr de forma pacífica.  Según él, los Estados Unidos tenían el deber de ser ejemplo para los pueblos oprimidos expandiendo la libertad por el mundo. De esta forma Jefferson se convirtió en uno de los creadores de la idea de que los Estados Unidos eran una nación predestinada a guiar al mundo a una nueva era por medio del abandono de la razón de estado y la aplicación de las convicciones morales a la política exterior. Esta idea de Jefferson estaba asociada a la distinción entre  republicanismo y monarquía. Las monarquías respondían a los intereses de los reyes y las repúblicas como los Estados Unidos a los intereses del pueblo, por ende, las repúblicas eran pacíficas y las monarquías no. Jefferson rechazaba la idea de que las repúblicas debían de permanecer pequeñas para sobrevivir. Éste creía posible la expansión pacífica de los Estados Unidos, es decir, la transformación de la nación norteamericana en un imperio sin sacrificar la libertad y el republicanismo democrático.

Territorio adquirido en la compra de Luisiana

Para Jefferson, conservar el carácter agrario del país era imprescindible para salvaguardar la naturaleza republicana de los Estados Unidos, pues era necesario que el país continuara siendo una sociedad de ciudadanos libres e independientes. Sólo a través de la expansión se podía garantizar la abundancia de tierra y, por ende, la subsistencia de las instituciones republicanas norteamericanas. Al apoyar la compra de Luisiana, Jefferson superó sus escrúpulos con relación a la interpretación de la constitución para garantizar su principal razón de estado: la expansión.

La era de los buenos sentimientos

Años de controversias relacionadas a los derechos comerciales de los Estados Unidos culminaron en 1812 con el estallido de una guerra contra Gran Bretaña. El fin de la llamada Guerra de 1812 trajo consigo un periodo de estabilidad y consenso nacional conocido como la  Era de los buenos sentimientos. Sin embargo,  a nivel internacional la situación de los Estados Unidos era todavía complicada, pues era necesario resolver dos asuntos muy importantes: mejorar las relaciones con Gran Bretaña y definir la frontera sur. La solución de ambos asuntos estuvo relacionada con la expansión territorial.

Mejorar las relaciones con Gran Bretañas tras dos guerras resultó ser una tarea delicada que fue facilitada por realidades económicas: Gran Bretaña era el principal mercado de los Estados Unidos.En 1818, los británicos y norteamericanos resolvieron algunos de sus problemas a través de la negociación. Los reclamos anglo-norteamericanos sobre el territorio de  Oregon era  uno de ellos. Los británicos tenían una antigua relación  con la región gracias a sus intereses en el comercio de pieles en la costa noroeste del  Pacífico.  Por su parte, los norteamericanos basaban sus reclamos en los viajes del Capitán Robert Gray (1792) y en famosa la expedición de Lewis y Clark  (1804-1806). En 1818, los Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña acordaron una ocupación conjunta de Oregon.  De acuerdo a ésta, el territorio permanecería abierto por un periodo de diez años.

Una vez resuelto los problemas con Gran Bretaña los norteamericanos se enfocaron en las disputas con España con relación a Florida. El interés norteamericano en la Florida era viejo y basado en necesidades estratégicas: evitar que Florida cayera en manos de una potencia europea. En 1819, España y los Estados Unidos firmaron el Tratado Adams-Onís por el que Florida pasó a ser un territorio norteamericano a cambio de que los Estados Unidos pagaran los reclamos de los residentes de la península hasta un total de $5 millones. La adquisición de Florida también puso fin a los temores de los norteamericanos de un posible ataque por su frontera sur.

La Doctrina Monroe

El fin de la era de las revoluciones atlánticas a principios de la década de 1820 generó nuevas preocupaciones en los  Estados Unidos. Los líderes estadounidenses vieron con recelo los acontecimientos en Europa, donde las fuerzas más conservadoras controlaban las principales reinos e imperaba un ambiente represivo y extremadamente reaccionario.  El principal temor  de los norteamericanos era la posibilidad da una intervención europea para reestablecer el control español en sus excolonias americanas. A los británicos también les preocupaba tal contingencia  y tantearon la posibilidad de una alianza con los Estados Unidos. La propuesta británica provocó un gran debate entre los miembros de la administración del presidente James Monroe. El Secretario de Estado John Quincy Adams  desconfiaba de los británicos y temía que cualquier compromiso con éstos pudiese limitar las posibilidades de expansión norteamericana. Adams temía la posibilidad de una intervención europea en América, pero estaba seguro que  de darse  tal intervención Gran Bretaña se opondría de todas maneras para defender sus intereses, sobre todo, comerciales. Por ello concluía que los Estados Unidos no sacarían ningún beneficio aliándose con Gran Bretaña. Para él, la mejor opción para los Estados Unidos era mantenerse actuando solos.

Los argumentos de Adams influyeron la posición del presidente Monroe quien rechazó la alianza con los británicos. El 2 de diciembre de 1823, Monroe leyó un importante mensaje ante el Congreso. Parte del  contenido de este mensaje pasaría a ser conocido como la Doctrina Monroe. En su mensaje, Monroe enfatizó la singularidad (“uniqueness”) de los Estados Unidos y definió el llamado principio de la “noncolonization,” es decir, el rechazo norteamericano a la colonización, recolonización y/o transferencia de territorios americanos. Además, Adams estableció una política de exclusión de Europa de los asuntos americanos y definió  así las ideas principales de la Doctrina Monroe. Las palabras de Monroe constituyeron una declaración formal de que los Estados Unidos pretendían convertirse en el poder dominante en el hemisferio occidental.

Es necesario aclarar que la Doctrina Monroe fue una fanfarronada porque en 1823 los Estados Unidos no tenían el  poderío para hacerla cumplir. Sin embargo, esta doctrina será una de las piedras angulares de la política exterior norteamericana en América Latina hasta finales del siglo XX y una de las bases ideológicas del expansionismo norteamericano.

El Destino Manifiesto

John L. O’Sullivan

En 1839, el periodista norteamericano John L. O’Sullivan escribió un artículo periodístico justificando la expansión territorial de los Estados Unidos. Según O’Sullivan, los Estados Unidos eran un pueblo  escogido por Dios y destinado a expandirse a lo largo de América del Norte. Para O’Sullivan, la expansión no era una opción para los norteamericanos, sino un destino que éstos no podían renunciar ni evitar porque estarían rechazando la voluntad de Dios. O’Sullivan también creía que los norteamericanos tenían una misión que cumplir: extender la libertad y la democracia, y ayudar a las razas inferiores.  Las ideas de O’Sullivan no eran nuevas, pero llegaron en un momento de gran agitación nacionalista y expansionista en la historia de los Estados Unidos.  Éstas fueron adaptadas bajo una frase que el propio O’Sullivan acuñó, el destino manifiesto, y se convirtieron en la justificación básica del expansionismo norteamericano.

La idea del destino manifiesto estaba enraizada en la visión de los Estados Unidos como una nación excepcional destinada a civilizar a los pueblos atrasados y expandir la libertad por el mundo. Es decir, en una visión mesiánica y mística que veía en la expansión norteamericana la expresión de la voluntad de Dios. Ésta estaba también basada en un concepto claramente racista que dividía a los seres humanos en razas superiores e inferiores. De ahí que se pensara que era deber de las razas superiores “ayudar” a las inferiores. Como miembros de una “raza superior”, la anglosajona, los norteamericanos debían cumplir con su deber y misión.

La anexión de Oregon

Como sabemos, en 1819, los Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña acordaron ocupar de forma conjunta el territorio de Oregon. Ambos países reclamaban ese territorio como suyo y al no poder ponerse de acuerdo optaron por compartirlo.  Por los próximos veinte cinco años, miles de colonos norteamericanos emigraron y se establecieron en Oregon estimulados por el gobierno de los Estados Unidos.

Las elecciones presidenciales de 1844 estuvieron dominadas por el tema de la expansión. La candidatura de James K. Polk por los demócratas estuvo basada en la propuesta de “recuperar” Oregon y anexar Texas. Polk era un expansionista realista que presionó a los británicos dando la impresión de ser intransigente y estar dispuesto a una guerra, pero que en el momento apropiado fue capaz de negociar. En 1846, el Presidente Polk solicitó la retirada británica del territorio de Oregon aprovechando que complicada por problemas en su imperio, Gran Bretaña no estaba en condiciones para resistir tal pedido.  Tras una negociación se acordó establecer la frontera en el paralelo 49 y todo el territorio al sur de esa  frontera pasó a ser parte de los Estados Unidos.

American Progress, John Gast , 1872

Texas

En 1821, un ciudadano norteamericano llamado Moses Austin fue autorizado por el gobierno mexicano a establecer 300 familias estadounidenses en Texas, que para esa época era un territorio mexicano. La llegada de Austin y su grupo de emigrantes marcó el origen de una colonia norteamericana en Texas. El número de norteamericanos residentes en Texas creció considerablemente  hasta alcanzar un total de 20,000 en el año 1830. Las relaciones con el gobierno de México se afectaron negativamente cuando los mexicanos, preocupados por el gran número de norteamericanos residentes en Texas, buscaron reestablecer el control político del territorio. Para ello los mexicanos recurrieron a frenar la emigración de ciudadanos estadounidenses y a limitar el gobierno propio que disfrutaban los texanos (norteamericanos residentes en Texas). Todo ello llevó a los texanos a tomar acciones drásticas. En 1836, éstos se rebelaron contra el gobierno mexicano buscando su independencia.  Tras una derrota inicial en la Batalla del Álamo, los texanos derrotaron a los mexicanos en la Batalla de San Jacinto y con ello lograron su independencia.

Después de derrotar a los mexicanos y declararse independientes, los texanos solicitaron se admitiera a Texas como un estado de la unión norteamericana. Este pedido provocó un gran debate en los Estados Unidos, pues no todos los norteamericanos estaban contentos con la idea de que Texas, un territorio esclavista, se convirtiera en un estado de la unión. Los sureños eran los principales defensores de la concesión de la estadidad a Texas, pues sabían que con ello aumentaría la representación de los estados esclavistas en el Congreso (la asamblea legislativa estadounidense). Los norteños se  oponían a la concesión de la estadidad a Texas porque no quería fortalecer políticamente a la esclavitud dando vida a un nuevo estado esclavista. Además, algunos norteamericanos estaban temerosos de la posibilidad de un guerra innecesaria con México por causa de Texas, pues creían que el gobierno mexicano no toleraría que los Estados Unidos anexaran su antiguo territorio.

El tema de Texas sacó a flote las complejidades y contradicciones de la expansión norteamericana. La expansión podría traer consigo la semilla de la libertad como alegaban algunos, pero también de la esclavitud y la autodestrucción nacional. Cada nuevo territorio sacaba a relucir la pregunta sobre el futuro de la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos y esto provocaba intensos debates e inclusive la amenaza de la secesión de los estados sureños.

La guerra con México

La elección de Polk como presidente de los Estados Unidos aceleró el proceso de estadidad para Texas. Éste era un ferviente creyente de la idea del destino manifiesto y de la expansión territorial. Durante su campaña presidencial, Polk se comprometió con la anexión de Texas. En 1845, Texas fue no sólo anexada, sino también incorporada como un estado de la Unión. Ello obedeció a tres razones: la necesidad de asegurar la frontera sur, evitar intervenciones extranjeras en Texas y el peligro de una movida texana a favor de Gran Bretaña. Como habían planteado los opositores a la concesión de la estadidad a Texas, México no aceptó la anexión de Texas y  rompió sus relaciones diplomáticas con los Estados Unidos. Con la anexión de Texas, los Estados Unidos hicieron suyos los problemas fronterizos que existían entre los texanos y el gobierno de México, lo que eventualmente provocó una guerra con ese país. La superioridad militar de los norteamericanos sobre los mexicanos fue total. Las tropas estadounidenses llegaron inclusive a ocupar la ciudad capital del México.

Las fáciles victorias norteamericanos desataron un gran nacionalismo en los Estados Unidos y llevaron a algunos norteamericanos a favorecer la anexión de todo el territorio mexicano. Los sureños se opusieron a la posible anexión de todo México por razones raciales, pues consideraban a los mexicanos racialmente incapaces de incorporarse a los Estados Unidos.  Algunos estados del norte, bajo la influencia de un fuerte sentimiento expansionista, favorecieron la anexión de todo México. Tras grandes debates sólo fue anexado una parte del territorio mexicano.

Territorio arrebatado a México en 1848

En el Tratado de Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848)  que puso fin a la guerra, los Estados Unidos duplicaron su territorio al adquirir los actuales estados de California, Nuevo México, Arizona, Utah, y Nevada; México perdió la mitad de su territorio; México reconoció la anexión de Texas y los Estados Unidos acordaron pagarle  a México una indemnización de  $15 millones. Con ello los Estados Unidos lograron expandirse del océano Atlántico hasta el océano Pacífico. La guerra aumentó del poder de los Estados Unidos, fortaleció la seguridad del país y se abrió posibilidades de comercio con Asia a través de los puertos californianos. Sin embargo, la expansión alcanzada también expuso las debilidades domésticas de los Estados Unidos, exacerbando el  debate en torno a la esclavitud en los nuevos territorios, lo que endureció el problema del seccionalismo y llevó a la guerra civil. La victoria sobre México también promovió la expansión en territorios en poder de los amerindios norteamericanos lo que desembocó en  las llamadas guerras indias y en la reubicación forzosa de miles de nativos americanos.

Expansionismo y esclavitud

La década de 1850 estuvo caracterizada por un profundo debate en torno al futuro de la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos. Los estados sureños vieron en la expansión territorial un mecanismo para fortalecer la esclavitud incorporando territorios esclavistas a la unión norteamericana. Con ello pretendían alterar el balance político de la nación a su favor creando una mayoría de estados esclavistas. Es necesario señalar que los esfuerzos de los estados sureños fueran bloqueados por el  Norte que se oponía  a la expansión de la esclavitud.

El principal objetivo de los expansionistas en este periodo fue la isla de Cuba por ser ésta una colonia esclavista de gran importancia económica y estratégica para los Estados Unidos. En 1854, los norteamericanos trataron, sin éxito, de comprarle Cuba a España por $130 millones de dólares. Los Estados Unidos tendrían que esperar más de cuarenta años para  conseguir por las armas lo que no lograron por la diplomacia.

La compra de Alaska

William H. Seward

En el periodo posterior a la guerra civil la política exterior norteamericana estuvo desorientada, lo que frenó el renacer de las ansias expansionistas. El resurgir del expansionismo estuvo asociado a la figura del Secretario de Estado William H. Seward (1801-1872). Seward era un ferviente expansionista que tenía interés en la creación de un imperio norteamericano que incluyera  Canadá, América Latina y Asia. Los planes imperialistas de Seward no pudieron concretarse y éste tuvo que conformarse con la adquisición de Alaska.

Alaska había sido explorada a lo largo de los siglos XVII y XVIII por británicos, franceses, españoles y rusos. Sin embargo, fueron estos últimos quienes iniciaron la colonización del territorio. En 1867, los Estados Unidos y Rusia entraron en conversaciones con relación al futuro de Alaska. Ambos países tenían interés en la compra-venta de Alaska por diferentes razones. Para Seward, la compra de Alaska era necesaria para garantizar la seguridad del noroeste norteamericano y expandir el comercio con Asia. Por sus parte, los rusos necesitaban dinero, Alaska era un carga económica y la colonización del territorio había sido muy difícil. Además, el costo de la defensa de Alaska era prohibitivo para Rusia. En marzo de 1867 se llegó a un acuerdo de compra-venta por $7.2 millones.

El problema de Seward no fue comprar Alaska, sino convencer a los norteamericanos de la necesidad de ello. La compra enfrentó fuerte oposición, pues se consideraba que Alaska era un territorio inservible. De ahí que se le describiera con frases como  “Seward´s Folly,” Seward´s Icebox,” o “Polar Bear Garden.” Tras mucho debate, la compra fue eventualmente aceptada y aprobada por el Congreso. Lo que en su momento pareció una locura resultó ser un gran negocio para los Estados Unidos, pues hoy en día Alaska produce el 25% del petróleo de los Estados Unidos y posee el 30% de las reservas de petróleo estadounidenses.

Hawai

Para comienzos de la década de 1840, Hawai se había convertido en una de las paradas más importantes para los barcos norteamericanos en un ruta a China. Esto generó el interés de ciertos sectores de la sociedad norteamericana.  Los primeros norteamericanos en establecerse en las islas fueron comerciantes y misioneros.  A éstos le siguieron inversionistas interesados en la producción de azúcar. Antes de 1890 el principal objetivo norteameamericano no era la anexión de Hawai, sino prevenir que otra potencia controlara el archipiélago. La actitud norteamericana hacia Hawai cambió gracias a la labor misionera, la creciente importancia de la producción azucarera como consecuencia de la reciprocidad comercial con los Estados Unidos y la importancia estratégica de las islas. El crecimiento de la población no hawaiana (norteamericanos, japoneses y chinos)  despertó la preocupación de los locales, quienes se sentían invadidos y temerosos de perder el control de su país ante la creciente influencia de los extranjeros.  La muerte en 1891  del rey Kalākaua y el ascenso al trono de  su hermana Liliuokalani provocó una fuerte reacción de parte de la comunidad norteamericana en la islas, pues la reina era una líder nacionalista que quería reafirmar la soberanía hawaiana. Los azucareros y misioneros norteamericanos la destronan en 1893 y solicitaron la anexión a los Estados Unidos. Contrario a los esperado por los norteamericanos residentes en Hawai, la estadidad no les fue concedida. Además, el Presidente Grover Cleveland encargó a James Blount investigar lo ocurrido en Hawai.  Blount viajó  a las islas y redactó un informa muy criticó de las acciones de los norteamericanos en Hawai, concluyendo que a mayoría de los hawaianos favorecían a la monarquía. Cleveland era un anti-imperialista convencido por lo que el informe de Blount lo colocó en un gran dilema: ¿restaurar por la fuerza a la reina o anexar Hawai?  Lo controversial de ambas posibles acciones llevó a Cleveland a no hacer nada.

Liliuokalani, última reina de Hawaii

Ante la imposibilidad de la estadidad, los norteamericanos en Hawai optaron por organizar un gobierno republicano. El estallido de la Guerra hispano-cubano-norteamericana en 1898 abrió las puertas a la anexión de  Hawai. Noventa  y cinco  años más tarde el Presidente William J. Clinton firmó una  disculpa oficial por el derrocamiento de la reina Liliuokalani.

La expansión extra-continental

Como hemos visto, a lo largo del siglo XIX los norteamericanos se expandieron ocupando territorios contiguos como Luisiana,  Texas y California. Sin embargo, para finales del siglo XIX la expansión territorial norteamericana entró en una nueva etapa caracterizada por la adquisición de territorios ubicados fuera  de los límites geográficos de América del Norte. La    adquisición  de Puerto Rico, Filipinas, Guam y Hawai dotó a los Estados Unidos de un imperio insular.

La expansión de finales del siglo XIX difería del expansionismo de años anteriores por varias razones. Primero, los  territorios adquiridos no sólo no eran contiguos, sino que algunos de ellos estaban ubicados muy lejos de los Estados Unidos. Segundo, estos territorios tenían una gran concentración poblacional. Por ejemplo, a la llegada de los norteamericanos a Puerto Rico la isla tenía casi un millón de habitantes. Tercero, los territorios estaban habitados por pueblos no blancos con culturas, idiomas y religiones muy diferentes a los Estados Unidos. En las Filipinas los norteamericanos encontraron católicos, musulmanes y cazadores de cabezas. Cuarto, los territorios estaban ubicados en zonas peligrosas o estratégicamente complicadas. Las Filipinas estaban rodeadas de colonias europeas y demasiado cerca de una potencia emergente y agresiva: Japón. Quinto, algunos de esos territorios resistieron violentamente la dominación norteamericana. Los filipinos no aceptaron pacíficamente el dominio norteamericano y se rebelaron. Pacificar las Filipinas les costó a los norteamericanos miles de vidas y millones de dólares. Sexto, contrario a lo que había sido la tradición norteamericana, los nuevos territorios no fueron incorporados, sino que fueron convertidos en colonias de los Estados Unidos. Todos estos factores explican porque algunos historiadores ven en las acciones norteamericanas de finales del siglo XIX un rompimiento con el pasado expansionistas de los Estados Unidos. Sin embargo, para otros historiadores –incluyendo quien escribe– la expansión de 1898 fue un episodio más de un proceso crecimiento imperialista iniciado a fines del siglo XVIII.

Para explicar la  expansión extra-continental se han usado varios argumentos. Algunos historiadores  han alegado que los norteamericanos se expandieron más allá de sus fronteras geográficas por causas económicas. Según éstos, el desarrollo industrial que vivió el país en las últimas décadas del siglo XIX hizo que los norteamericanos fabricaran más productos de los que podían consumir. Esto provocó excedentes que generaron serios problemas económicos como el desempleo, la inflación, etc. Para superar estos problemas los norteamericanos salieron a buscar nuevos mercados donde vender sus productos y fuentes de materias primas. Esa búsqueda provocó la adquisición de colonias y la expansión extra-continental.

Otros historiadores han favorecidos explicaciones de tipo ideológico. Según éstos, la idea de que la expansión era el destino de los Estados Unidos jugó, junto al sentido de misión, un papel destacado en el expansionismo norteamericanos de finales del siglo XIX. Los norteamericanos tenían un destino que cumplir y nada ni nadie podía detenerlos porque era la expresión de la voluntad divina.

La religión y la raza también ha jugado un papel importante en la explicación de las acciones imperialistas de los Estados Unidos. Según algunos historiadores, los norteamericanos fueron empujados por el afán misionero, es decir, por la idea de que la expansión del cristianismo era la voluntad de Dios. En otras palabras, para muchos norteamericanos la expansión era necesaria para llevar con ella la palabra de Dios a pueblos no cristianos.  Como miembros de una raza superior –la anglosajona– los estadounidenses debían cumplir un papel civilizador entre las razas inferiores y para ello era necesaria la expansión extra-continental.

Alfred T. Mahan

Los factores militares y estratégicos también han jugado un papel de importancia en la explicación del comportamiento imperialista de los norteamericanos. Según algunos historiadores, la necesidad de bases navales para la creciente marina de guerra de los Estados Unidos fue otra causa del expansionismo extra-continental. Éstos apuntan a la figura del Capitán Alfred T. Mahan como una fuerza influyente en el desarrollo del expansionismo extra-continental . En 1890, Mahan publicó un libro titulado The Influence of Sea Power upon History que influyó considerablemente a toda una generación de líderes norteamericanos. En su libro Mahan proponía la construcción de una marina de guerra poderosa que fuera capaz de promover y defender los intereses estratégicos y comerciales de los Estados Unidos. Según Mahan, el crecimiento de la Marina debía estar acompañado de la adquisición de colonias para la construcción de bases navales y carboneras.

Una de las explicaciones más novedosas del porque del expansionismo imperialista recurre al género. Según la historiadora norteamericana Kristin Hoganson, el impulso imperialista era una manifestación de la crisis de  la masculinidad norteamericana amenazada por el sufragismo femenino y las nuevas actitudes y posiciones femeninas. En otras palabras, algunos norteamericanos como Teodoro Roosevelt defendieron y promovieron el imperialismo como un mecanismo para reafirmar el dominio masculino sobre la sociedad norteamericana.

La expansión norteamericana de finales del siglo XIX fue un proceso muy complejo y, por ende, difícil de explicar con una sola causa. En otras palabras, es necesario prestar atención a todas las posibles explicaciones del imperialismo norteamericano para poder entenderle.

La Guerra hispano-cubano-norteamericana

En 1898, los Estados Unidos y España pelearon una corta, pero muy importante guerra. La principal causa de la llamada guerra hispanoamericana fue la isla de Cuba. Para finales del siglo XIX, el otrora poderoso imperio español estaba compuesto por las Filipinas, Cuba y Puerto Rico. De éstas la más importante era, sin lugar a dudas, Cuba porque esta isla era la principal productora de azúcar del mundo. La riqueza de Cuba era fundamental para el gobierno español, de ahí que los españoles mantuvieron un estricto control sobre la isla. Sin embargo, este control no pudo evitar el desarrollo de un fuerte sentimiento nacionalista entre los cubanos. Hartos del colonialismo español, en 1895 los cubanos se rebelaron provocando una sangrienta guerra de independencia.  Al comienzo de este conflicto el gobierno norteamericano buscó mantenerse neutral, pero el interés histórico en la isla, el desarrollo de la guerra, las inversiones norteamericanas en la isla (unos $50 millones) y la cercanía de Cuba (a sólo 90 millas de la Florida) hicieron imposible que los norteamericanos no intervinieran buscando acabar con la guerra. La situación se agravó cuando el 15 de febrero de 1898 un barco de guerra norteamericano, el USS Maine, anclado en la bahía de la Habana, explotó  matando a 266 marinos. La destrucción del Maine  generó un gran sentimiento anti-español en los Estados Unidos que obligó al gobierno norteamericano a declararle la guerra a España.

El Maine hundido en la bahía de la Habana

La guerra fue una conflicto corto que los Estados Unidos ganaron con mucha facilidad gracias a su enorme superioridad militar y económica. En el Tratado de París que puso fin a la guerra hispanoamericana, España renunció a Cuba, le cedió Puerto Rico a los norteamericanos como compensación por el costo de la guerra y entregó las Filipinas a los Estados Unidos a cambio $20,000,000. A pesar de lo corto de su duración, esta guerra tuvo consecuencias muy importantes. Primero, la guerra marcó la transformación de los Estados Unidos en una potencia mundial. El poderío que demostraron los norteamericanos al derrotar fácilmente a España dio a entender al resto del mundo que la nación norteamericana se había convertido en un país poderoso al que había que tomar en cuenta y respetar. Segundo, gracias a la guerra los Estados Unidos se convirtieron en una nación con colonias en Asia y el Caribe lo que cambió su situación geopolítica y estratégica. Tercero, la guerra cambió la historia de varios países: España se vio debilitada y en medio de una crisis; Cuba ganó su independencia, pero permaneció bajo la influencia y el control indirecto de los Estados Unidos; las Filipinas no sólo vieron desaparecer la oportunidad de independencia, sino que también fueron controladas por los norteamericanos por medio de una controversial guerra; Puerto Rico pasó a ser una colonia de los Estados Unidos.

Con la expansión extra-continental de finales del siglo XIX se cerró la expansión territorial de los Estados Unidos, pero no su crecimiento imperialista ni su transformación en la potencia dominante del siglo XX.

            Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Bibliografía mínima:

Beisner, Robert L. From the Old Diplomacy to the New, 1865-1900. Arlington Heights, Illinois: Harlan Davidson, Inc., 1986.

Benjamin, Jules R. The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution an Empire of Liberty in an Age of National Liberation. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press, 1990.

Bouvier, Virginia Marie. Whose America? The War of 1898 and the Battles to Define the Nation. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 2001.

Drinnon, Richard. Facing West the Metaphysics of Indian-Hating and Empire-Building. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1980.

Foner, Philip Sheldon. The Spanish-Cuban-American War and the Birth of American Imperialism, 1895-1902. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1972.

Healy, David. U S Expansionism. The Imperialist Urge in the 1890’s. Madison, Milwaukee and   London: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1970.

Heidler, David Stephen, and Jeanne T. Heidler. Manifest Destiny. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2003.

__________________________________. The Mexican War. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2006.

Henderson, Timothy J. A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States. New York: Hill and Wang, 2008.

Hietala, Thomas. Manifest Destiny: Anxious Aggrandizement in Late Jacksonian America. Ithaca: Cornell University press, 1985.

Hoganson, Kristin L. Fighting for American Manhood How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998.

Horsman, Reginald. Race and Manifest Destiny the Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1981.

Johannsen, Roberet W. To the Halls of Montezuma: The Mexican War in the American Imagination. New York: Oxford, 1984.

Kastor, Peter J. The Louisiana Purchase: Emergence of an American Nation. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002.

Kennedy, Philip W. “Race and American Expansion in Cuba and Puerto Rico, 1895-1905.” Journal of Black Studies 1, no. 3 (1971): 306-16.

LaFeber, Walter. The New Empire: an Interpretation of American Expansion, 1860-1898. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1963.

Levinson, Sanford, and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion, 1803-1898. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

Libura, Krystyna, Luis Gerardo Morales Moreno y Jesús Velasco Márquez. Ecos de la guerra entre México y los Estados Unidos. México, D.F.: Ediciones Tecolote, 2004.

Love, Eric Tyrone Lowery. Race over Empire Racism and U.S. Imperialism, 1865-1900. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

May, Ernest R. Imperial Democracy the Emergence of America as a Great Power.  New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1961.

Merk, Frederick. Manifest Destiny and Mission in American History a Reinterpretation. 1st ed.  New York: Knopf, 1963.

Morgan, H. Wayne. America’s Road to Empire the War with Spain and Overseas Expansion. New York: Wiley, 1965.

Offner, John L. An Unwanted War the Diplomacy of the United States and Spain over Cuba, 1895-1898. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992.

Pérez, Louis A. The War of 1898 the United States and Cuba in History and Historiography. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

Picó, Fernando. 1898–La guerra después de la guerra.  Río Piedras: Ediciones Huracán, 1987.

Pratt, Julius W. Expansionist of 1898; the Acquisition of Hawaii and the Spanish Islands. Baltimore: John Hopkins Press, 1936.

Rickover, Hyman George. How the Battleship Maine Was Destroyed. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1994.

Robinson, Cecil. The View from Chapultepec: Mexican Writers on the Mexican-American War. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1989.

Rodríguez Beruff, Jorge. “Cultura y Geopolítica: Un acercamiento a la visión de Alfred Thayer Mahan sobre el Caribe.” Op. Cit. Revista del Centro Investigaciones Históricas 11 (1999): 173-89.

Schirmer, Daniel B. Republic or Empire American Resistance to the Philippine War. Cambridge, Mass: Schenkman Pub. Co., 1972.

Smith, Joseph. “The ‘Splendid Little War’ of 1898: a Reappraisal.” History 80, no. 258 (1995): 22-37.

Stephanson, Anders. Manifest Destiny American Expansionism and the Empire of Right. 1st ed. New York: Hill and Wang, 1995.

Torruella, Juan R. Global Intrigues: The Era of the Spanish-American War and the Rise of the United States to World Power. San Juan, P.R.: Editorial Universidad de Puerto Rico, 2006.

Vázquez, Josefina Zoraida. México al tiempo de su guerra con Estados Unidos, 1846-1848. México: Secretaría de Exteriores, El Colegio de México, Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1997.

Wegner, Dana, “New Interpretations of How the Maine was Lost,” en  Edward J. Marolda Theodore Roosevelt, the U.S. Navy, and the Spanish-American War. New York: Palgrave, 2001, pp. 7-17.

Welch, Richard W. Response to Imperialism.  The United States and the Philippine-American War, 1899-1902. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1979.

Weston, Rubin Francis. Racism in U.S. Imperialism the Influence of Racial Assumptions on American Foreign Policy, 1893-1946. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1972.

Zea, Leopoldo, y Adalberto Santana. El 98 y su impacto en Latinoamérica. México: Instituto Panamericano de Geografía e Historia : Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2001.

Wexley, Laura. Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in an Age of U. S. Imperialism. Chapell Hill & London: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Williams, William Appleman. The Roots of the Modern American Empire. A Study of the Growth and Shaping of Social Consciousness in a Market Place Society. New York: Vintage Books, 1969.

Read Full Post »

Próximos a conmemorar el cincuentenario de la peor crisis de la Guerra Fría, comparto con ustedes esta interesante nota de Leandro Morgenfeld sobre la Crisis de los misiles. Morgenfeld es docente  de la UBA y un estudioso  de las relaciones argentino-estadounidenses. Padre de la bitácora Vecinos en conflicto, Morgenfeld es un analista agudo de las relaciones de América Latina y Estados Unidos.

La crisis de los misiles y el sistema interamericano

La crisis de los misiles y el sistema interamericano
Por Leandro Morgenfeld (http://www.marcha.org.ar/1/)
A pocos días de cumplirse 50 años de la denominada “Crisis de los misiles” que puso al mundo al borde de una guerra nuclear un análisis de lo sucedido y el sistema interamericano, impulsado por EE.UU., que resultó de dicho acontecimiento.
En octubre de 1962 se temió, como nunca antes, el estallido de la tercera guerra mundial. El enfrentamiento Washington-Moscú llegó al punto de máxima tensión y se vivieron días dramáticos, hasta que finalmente se vislumbró una salida diplomática. Hoy, medio siglo más tarde, todavía se discuten los entretelones de las negociaciones entre Kennedy, Jruschov y Castro. Lo que no cabe duda es que la crisis permitió a Washington reposicionarse en América y evitar una mayor influencia del proceso revolucionario cubano.
La crisis desatada tras el descubrimiento estadounidense de misiles soviéticos con capacidad nuclear en Cuba no sólo llevó al mundo al borde de la guerra, sino que tuvo consecuencias importantes en el sistema interamericano. La tensión internacional se desató cuando aviones espía de Estados Unidos lograron fotografiar la instalación de misiles soviéticos en la isla caribeña, a pocas millas de Florida. La temida tercera conflagración mundial estuvo a punto de estallar en ese momento. La crisis efectivamente no se circunscribió a los dramáticos 13 días que transcurrieron entre el descubrimiento estadounidense de los misiles soviéticos emplazados en Cuba (15 de octubre) y el acuerdo entre la Casa Blanca y el Kremlin (28 de octubre). Es necesario analizar el contexto de la crisis, no circunscribiéndolo a ese momento específico de laguerra fría, sino ahondando en la relación Washington-La Habana desde una perspectiva histórica, incluyendo los procesos más cercanos al estallido de la misma, como la invasión de Bahía de Cochinos y la Operación Mangosta. Sólo así pueden entenderse las razones de la decisión soviética de desplegar misiles nucleares en Cuba (para evitar lo que se consideraba como un probable nuevo ataque estadounidense a la Isla), aunque también esa riesgosa jugada tenía que ver con el enfrentamiento global entre Washington y Moscú, y en particular con el conflicto por Berlín que se desarrollaba en ese momento.
El despliegue militar soviético, según muestran documentos recientemente desclasificados, fue superior al que entonces habían considerado las autoridades de la Administración Kennedy (el número de militares que Moscú envió a Cuba llegó casi a 50.000). La primera semana del conflicto, desde que se descubrieron los misiles -sin hacerse público- hasta el famoso discurso de Kennedy en el que dio cuenta del hallazgo a través de las fotografías de los aviones U-2 y se dispuso el bloqueo naval a Cuba, bajo el eufemismo de una “cuarentena”, es clave para entender la posición estadounidense. A partir de documentación ahora desclasificada, puede entenderse cómo se llegó a tomar la decisión del bloqueo, aplazando otras alternativas más temerarias impulsadas por los halcones del Pentágono, como el ataque aéreo, que hubiera iniciado una escalada y un enfrentamiento nuclear de consecuencias imprevisibles. El haber contado con una semana, antes de que el hallazgo se hubiera filtrado, permitió a la Administración Kennedy barajar alternativas menos riesgosas que la del ataque a Cuba, que casi con seguridad hubiera provocado una escalada de consecuencias trágicas para la humanidad entera.
La segunda semana del conflicto, cuando ya era público, también es clave para comprender el desenlace final. Estados Unidos desplegó las estrategias de la “zanahoria” y el “garrote”. Las acciones militares y las declaraciones guerreristas de los gobiernos de Washington y Moscú estuvieron acompañadas de negociaciones diplomáticas sigilosas, a través de canales informales. Las mismas llegaron a buen puerto: el Kremlin se comprometió a retirar los misiles y la Casa Blanca a no invadir Cuba. Además, aunque esto no se hizo público, Estados Unidos prometió retirar los misiles de la OTAN que había emplazado en Turquía para amenazar a la Unión Soviética. La crisis, de todas formas, no se cerró definitivamente el 28 de octubre, sino que siguió hasta que se concretaron los acuerdos. A partir de entonces, se estableció una línea de comunicación directa entre la Casa Blanca y el Kremlin para evitar en el futuro los cortocircuitos que en octubre de 1962 casi desembocaron en una guerra nuclear.
Más allá de las negociaciones entre Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética, la crisis provocó una movilización en todo el continente americano. Posibilitó a Washington reposicionarse en la región, luego de las dificultades que había tenido en enero de 1962 para excluir a Cuba del sistema interamericano (Argentina, Brasil, México, Chile, Bolivia y Ecuador se habían opuesto a expulsar a la isla de la OEA). La subordinación del continente tras los mandatos del Departamento de Estado, que se manifestó el 23 de octubre de 1962 (la OEA votó aplicar el Tratado Interamericano de Asistencia Reciproca para garantizar el bloqueo contra Cuba) fue posible, entre otras cuestiones, gracias al giro que se produjo en la relación entre Estados Unidos y Argentina tras el golpe contra Arturo Frondizi y la asunción de José María Guido. El canciller argentino Muñiz, en la OEA, dio impulso a la creación de una fuerza interamericana de intervención, que incluiría una “brigada argentina”, integrada por 10.000 efectivos militares, lista para interceder en cualquier lugar del continente. Además, Argentina participó en el bloqueo, enviando dos buques de guerra y aviones. Se produjo, en esos meses, un inédito alineamiento argentino tras las políticas del Departamento de Estado. Altos mandos de las fuerzas armadas visitaron frecuentemente el Pentágono, entre ellos el jefe del ejército, Onganía, quien adhirió en forma entusiasta a la Doctrina de Seguridad Nacional, impulsada por la Junta Interamericana de Defensa. Con este giro en la relación bilateral, se anticipaba la política de acercamiento a Washington que se profundizaría tras el golpe contra Illia, en 1966.
La crisis de los misiles, entonces, permitió a la Casa Blanca y al Pentágono avanzar en su política de aislar a Cuba del resto del continente y evitar que su influencia se expandiera. Ofreciendo ayuda financiera al gobierno de Guido, que zozobraba ante la aguda crisis económica y las presiones militares, Washington pudo profundizar su histórico objetivo estratégico de alentar la balcanización latinoamericana.

Read Full Post »

A mediados de abril de 1961, un grupo de exiliados cubanos armados y entrenados por el gobierno de los Estados Unidos desembarcaron en Cuba con la intención de derrocar el gobierno revolucionario cubano. La famosa invasión de Bahía de Cochinos es, sin lugar a dudas, uno de los más grandes fiascos de la  guerra fría. Mucho se ha escrito y comentado sobre este singular evento. Hoy, cincuenta años después, contamos con una nueva interpretación con una valor muy especial, ya que fue escrita por los historiadores de la oficina que tuvo en sus manos la planificación y ejecución de la invasión, la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA).

La Freedom of Information Act es una ley estadounidense que capacita a ciudadanos norteamericanos a requerir del gobierno de Estados Unidos la revelación total o parcial de documentos e información bajo su poder. Amparado en esta ley,  el National Security Archive –un instituto de investigación ubicado en la George Washington University– logró que la CIA hiciera público  la Official History of Bay of Pigs Operation.

Invasores capturados por las fuerzas revolucionarias cubanas

Esta historia –redactada por Jack Peiffer, historiador oficial de la CIA–  revela que la invasión fue un fracaso mayor de lo que hasta ahora sabíamos. Entre otras cosas, deja claro que incapaces de distinguir entre los aviones de la fuerza aérea  cubana y los de la CIA, los invasores dispararon contra su apoyo aéreo. Otro dato interesante es el uso de fondos destinados para la invasión para contratar sicarios profesionales para que asesinaran a Fidel Castro. La participación directa de estadounidenses en la invasión es otro tema relevante. Según esta historia, cuatro pilotos norteamericanos murieron en Bahía de Cochinos, pero no fue hasta 1976 que  recibieron medallas   póstumas por sus servicios.

Me parece indiscutible que esta versión oficial abonará al análisis de un momento cumbre de la guerra fría.

            Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, Perú, 15 de agosto de 2011

Read Full Post »

Según el servicio noticioso AFP, el gobierno de Cuba planea organizar excursiones a los restos sumergidos de seis barcos que fueron hundidos durante la guerra hispano-cubano-norteamericana.  Tres cruceros (Cristóbal Colón, Almirante Oquendo y Vizcaya) y dos destructores españoles (Plutón y Furor) fueron hundidos cuando intentaron romper el bloqueo del que eran objeto por parte de la marina de guerra de los Estados Unidos. El sexto barco –el vapor Merrimac– fue hundido por los españoles cuando sus tripulantes intentaban hundirle en la bahía de Santiago para bloquear la flota española allí atrapada. Esta movida cubana busca, sin lugar a dudas, incrementar los ingresos provenientes del turismo, una de las principales actividades económicas de la isla.

Restos del crucero Vizcaya

La batalla de Santiago fue librada a principios de julio de 1898 y constituye una de las muestras más claras del desigual combate que libraron españoles y norteamericanos. A fines de abril, la flota norteamericana del Atlántico al mando del Almirante William T. Sampson recibió órdenes de interceptar la flota española al mando del Almirante Pascual Cervera y Topete. Cervera había zarpado de España rumbo a Cuba para dar apoyo a las fuerzas españolas en la isla. A pesar de que la localización de los barcos españoles era incierta, los estadounidenses se lanzaron

Inglesia de San José bombardeada

en su búsqueda. El 12 de mayo, la flota norteamericana llegó a las costas de Puerto Rico pensando que Cervera se encontraba en San Juan. Desafortunadamente para los estadounidenses, los barcos españoles no se encontraban en aguas puertorriqueñas. Un intercambio con las defensas españoles provocó serios daños en la capital de la isla, que no había sido atacada desde finales del siglo XVIII.

William T. Sampson

Winfield Scott Schley

A fines de mayo, Cervera logró llegar sin ser detectado a la bahía de Santiago, donde quedó atrapado por las fuerzas navales norteamericanas que bloqueaban la isla.  Protegidos por las defensas de la ciudad, Cervera y sus hombres permanecieron en Santiago hasta la mañana del 3 de julio que intentaron escapar del bloqueo norteamericano. Superados abrumadoramente, los barcos españoles fueron destruidos por los norteamericanos comandados por el Comodoro Winfield Scott Schley, pues esa mañana Sampson había partido a reunirse con oficiales del ejército norteamericano en la zona de Siboney.    Todos los barcos españoles fueron hundidos o embarrancados por su tripulación. Cerca de 500 españoles murieron la mañana de 3 de julio, uno de los días más triste en la historia de la Marina española.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez,

Lima, Perú, 23 de mayo de 2010

Mapa de la campaña de Santiago, 1898

Read Full Post »

En la edición de noviembre-diciembre de 2009 de Diálogo –periódico digital de la Universidad de Puerto Rico– aparece publicado un corto ensayo titulado “El molino de piedra” donde su autor, el Profesor Pablo Navarro Rivera, examina una de las instituciones más peculiares del imperialismo norteamericano, la Carlisle Indian Industrial  School (CIIS). La CIIS fue creada en 1879 para lidiar con el llamado problema indio (“Indian problem”).  Qué hacer con las naciones indias despojadas en nombre del progreso fue un problema para los norteamericanos desde el periodo colonial.  Para la década de 1870 el debate giraba en torno a la posibilidad de incorporar a los amerindios a la sociedad norteamericana.   Los creadores de la CIIS creían que era posible convertir a los nativo americanos en ciudadano útiles a través de la educación y  la transculturación forzosa de miles de jóvenes amerindios.

Estudiantes de Carlisle en 1885

Esta escuela ubicada en una antigua base militar,  atendió a 10,700 estudiantes entre 1879 y 1918. Durante ese periodo la CIIS llevó a cabo lo que Navarro Rivera denomina como un genocidio cultural: americanizar a miles de amerindios imponiéndoles el idioma inglés, la vestimenta, la religión y las costumbres anglosajonas. Se buscaba  “matar al salvaje” que habitaba en el indio y dar vida a un “ser civilizado”, es decir, americanizado. Los propulsores de la CIIS creían que los amerindios podrían incorporarse a la sociedad blanca sólo si experimentaban una transformación radical, es decir, si  dejaban de ser lo que eran y se convertían en copias al carbón de los estadounidenses blancos.

El proceso de transculturación comenzaba con la llegada de los estudiantes. Cuando éstos  arribaban a Carlisle, se les tomaba una foto que servía para comparar al salvaje que entraba con el ser civilizado que saldría, se les bañaba, se les cortaba el pelo y se les vestía como “gente civilizada”. El uso del idioma vernáculo estaba totalmente prohibido y los estudiantes eran vigilados para evitar la socialización entre miembros de las misma etnias. El uso del inglés era un requisito indispensable para todos los internos.

La CIIS junto a otras instituciones como el Hampton Institute (Hampton, Virginia) y  la Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (Tuskegee, Alabama) se convirtieron en modelos de cómo lidiar con las minorías étnicas en los Estados Unidos. Según Navarro Rivera, tras la adquisición del imperio insular (Cuba y Puerto Rico), las autoridades norteamericanas aplicaron la experiencia adquirida con los minorías étnicas  norteamericanas a los pueblos conquistados en 1898.  Usando los esquemas raciales de su momento histórico, los  norteamericanos  que llegaron a las islas tras la guerra con España catalogaron a cubanos y puertorriqueños como “colored people” y, por ende, crearon sistemas educativos para educarles como eran educados los negros e indios en los EEUU. Además, crearon becas para enviarles a escuelas en los EEUU como la CIIS.

Según el Dr. Navarro Rivera,   60 niños puertorriqueños fueron enviados a Carlisle, hecho desatendido por  la historiografía puertorriqueña, “a pesar de su importancia para entender los primeros esfuerzos de adecuación colonial de Estados Unidos en Puerto Rico.” Su ensayo busca subsanar en parte ese desconocimiento analizando la experiencia de algunos de los puertorriqueños que fueron enviados a la CIIS.

El primer norteamericano encargado de la educación en Puerto Rico, el General John Eaton, fue también el primero en sugerir el envío de puertorriqueños a Carlisle. El primer Comisionado de Instrucción de Puerto Rico, Martin C. Brumbaugh, convenció en 1900 a la legislatura de la isla a asignar fondos para el envío de estudiantes puertorriqueños a los EEUU bajo la excusa de que  la isla “no contaba con buenas escuelas, no tenía instituciones de educación superior ni existían los recursos para construirlas.” El Comisionado recomendó el envío anual de 45 estudiantes a los Estados Unidos. Según Navarro, “Veinticinco varones irían a escuelas preparatorias y universidades y un segundo grupo de 20 jóvenes, varones y hembras, recibiría becas de $250 anuales del Gobierno para estudiar en lugares como Carlisle, Tuskegee y Hampton. Brumbaugh hizo posible con estas becas la extensión a Estados Unidos del proyecto educativo colonial que iniciaron en la Isla en 1898.”

Residencia de las niñas

Según el autor, solo 600 de los 10,700 alumnos que  estudiaron en Carlisle llegaron a graduarse.  Las fuentes no permiten determinar cuántos regresaron a sus lugares de origen, lo que “obstaculiza el estudio sobre el fenómeno del retorno.” Sí se sabe que   “un número significativo de puertorriqueños, tras irse de Carlisle, se quedaron en Estados Unidos o iniciaron una vida de continua migración entre dicho país y la Isla.”

Navarro   dedica  la parte final de su ensayo a examinar la experiencia de los puertorriqueños que estuvieron en Carlisle a través del estudio de la correspondencia de algunos de éstos. Desafortunadamente, no explica ni el origen ni la localización de estas fuentes. Lo que primero que señala el autor es que a los puertorriqueños que participaron en el programa no se les explicó con toda claridad la naturaleza de la escuela; en otras palabras, éstos no sabían que eran enviados a una escuela para indios. Navarro describe le caso de Juan José Osuna ­– quien llegaría a ser un reconocido educador puertorriqueño. Osuna llegó a Carlisle a los 15 años “bajo la impresión de que recibiría una educación profesional que lo prepararía para el campo del Derecho.” El autor también cita una carta de una estudiante de nombre Providencia Martínez:  “En ocasiones, cuando menciono la escuela para indios pienso que es un sueño. Realmente, no sabíamos que era una escuela regular para indios porque la Srta. Weekly no nos dijo la verdad.” El autor no aclara si este desconocimiento sobre la naturaleza de Carlisle fue producto de mal entendidos o de una estrategia de las autoridades coloniales estadounidenses.

Estudiantes ejercitándose en el gimnasio de Carlisle

Según el autor, en 1901 un grupo de estudiantes y padres le escribió a Luis Muñoz Rivera, uno de los principales líderes políticos puertorriqueños de principios del siglo XX, quejándose de Carlisle. Las cartas hicieron que Muñoz visitara la escuela en agosto de 1901. Según Navarro, Muñoz Rivera  escribió un artículo sobre su visita – artículo que desafortunadamente  el autor no identifica– donde señalaba que le preguntó a los puertorriqueños que encontró en Carlisle si querían regresar a la isla y que éstos le respondieron que querían quedarse en la escuela para aprender ingles.

Es curioso que Navarro señale que poco antes de la visita de Muñoz, tres estudiantes puertorriqueños se escaparon de la escuela. Otros dos estudiantes se escaparon en 1902. Del grupo que llegó en 1900, por lo menos 11 se retiraron de la escuela por solicitud de sus padres y 4 por razones de salud.  ¿Le mintieron los estudiantes puertorriqueños a Muñoz Rivera? Después de 1901, sólo 5 estudiantes puertorriqueños fueron admitidos a la escuela lo que lleva Navarro a concluir que:  “La evidencia sugiere que la experiencia negativa que tuvieron los puertorriqueños en Carlisle llevó al gobierno de Estados Unidos a suspender las becas que ofrecían en Puerto Rico para estudiar allí y, finalmente, ordenar que los puertorriqueños becados abandonaran CIIS en 1905.”

Este  ensayo rebela las intersecciones de la esferas domésticas y externas del imperialismo norteamericano.  Navarro muestra como una institución creada para atender a un sector de los sujetos coloniales domésticos o internos (los amerindios) es  también usada para buscar la americanización de los sujetos coloniales externos adquiridos en 1898. El autor deja claro el papel que jugó la  CIIS como instrumento del imperialismo estadounidense para atender los “problemas” que representaban las nuevas posesiones insulares.

Estudiantes de escuela elemental

Estudiantes de escuela elemental

Este ensayo de Navaro Rivera trabajo también deja claro la necesidad de que la historiografía puertorriqueña –yo añadiría, la latinoamericana en general– preste atención al papel que jugaron instituciones educativas, científicas, artísticas y profesionales estadounidenses en el desarrollo del imperialismo norteamericano en Puerto Rico (y América Latina).

Dos comentarios finales. Primero, extraño la ausencia de los filipinos en este ensayo. Dudo mucho que la avanzada americanizadora se limitara a cubanos y puertorriqueños y me gustaría saber si las fuentes revisadas por Navarro Rivera reflejan la presencia de estudiantes filipinos en la CIIS. Segundo, el autor no identifica de forma clara las fuentes que utiliza. Aunque este no es un ensayo publicado en un revista académica, el autor  y los editores debieron proveer la información básica sobre las fuentes que sustentas los argumentos de Navarro Rivera.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, Ph. D.

Lima, Perú, 14 de febrero de 2010

Nota: Todas las traducciones del inglés son mi responsabilidad. A los interesados en este tema recomiendo visitar los siguientes:

  1. Pablo Navarro Rivera, “Acculturation Under Duress: The Puerto Rican Experience at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School 1898-1918”
  2. Carlisle Indian Industrial School Research Page
  3. Carlisle Indian Industrial School History

Read Full Post »

Acabo literalmente de tropezar con una interesantísima página española dedicada la figura  del Almirante Pascual Cervera  y Topete. El Almirante Cervera es uno de los personas más trágicos de la guerra de 1898. Comandante de la flota española del Atlántico, Cervera fue enviado al Caribe a cooperar en la defensa marítima de las colonias españolas amenazadas por las fuerzas navales estadounidenses.  Conciente de la inferioridad y pésimo estado de las fuerzas bajo su mando, Cervera navegó rumbo a lo que sabía sería un desastre. Tras evadir el bloqueo naval de los norteamericanos,   Cervera arribó a Santiago de Cuba el 19 de mayo de 1898, donde fue cercado por la marina de guerra de los Estados Unidos. El 3 de julio, la flota de Cervera forzó su salida de la bahía y fue destruida en un heroico y desigual combate por los barcos del Almirante William T. Sampson. Es necesario subrayar que Cervera se enfrentó a un fuerza naval muy superior a la suya.

Crucero español Cristóbal Colón. Éste fue enviado al Caribe sin su artillería principal y fue embarrancado por su tripulación durante la batalla de Santiago.

El creador de esta página, Angel Luis Cervera Fantoni,  no se ha limitado a honrar la memoria de su antepasado. Además de un sección dedicada a la vida del Almirante Cervera, esta página contiene otras secciones de muchos interés, asociadas al tema de la guerra hispanoamericana. Una de las secciones, aún en construcción, está dedicada  a la España de 1898 y pretende brindarnos información sobre temas como la vida diaria en la península a finales del siglo XIX. Otra sección de gran interés es la que Cervera Fantoni titula Fuentes documentales y multimedias, pues recoge documentales  españoles y norteamericanos sobre la guerra hispanoamericana. Una sección de colaboraciones agrupa una pequeña selección de escritos relacionadas a la armada española y su participación en la guerra contra los Estados Unidos. Otra sección, que lamentablemente no está del todo completa, enfoca las consecuencias y el significado de la guerra para España. Por último, es necesario subrayar  que cada sección está acompañada de un valiosa sección fotográfica.

En resumen, está página es un gran recurso para todos aquellos interesados en  una guerra que a pesar de su corta duración, cambio la historia de cinco naciones.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez,

Lima, Perú, 14 de diciembre de 2009

Read Full Post »

He tropezado con una interesantísima selección de fotos de la Guerra hispanoamericana procedentes  de la Photographic Collection de la State Library and Archives of Florida. El estado de Florida, y en especial la ciudad de Tampa, jugaron un papel muy importante durante la guerra. Tampa sirvió de base de entrenamiento y operaciones para la campaña del Caribe. En esa ciudad se congregaron miles de soldados y toneladas de equipo bélico para la invasión de Cuba y Puerto Rico. La llegada de unos 30,000 soldados cambió la vida de lo que hasta ese entonces había sido una pequeña ciudad en la costa oriental de la Florida. Estas fotos   nos presentan el lado norteamericano del conflicto, de ahí su gran valor histórico. Espero que las disfruten.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, Ph. D.

Lima, Perú, 3 de agosto de 2009

Voluntarios del Tercer Regimiento de Voluntarios de Nebraska marchando en Pablo Beach, Florida

Voluntarios del Tercer Regimiento de Voluntarios de Nebraska marchando en Pablo Beach, Florida

De izquierda a derecha: Mayor George Dunn, Mayor Alexander Brodie, Mayor General Joseph Wheeler,  Capellán Henry A. Brown,  Coronel Leonard Wood, y Coronel Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt. (later 26th U.S. President).

De izquierda a derecha: Mayor George Dunn, Mayor Alexander Brodie, Mayor General Joseph Wheeler, Capellán Henry A. Brown, Coronel Leonard Wood y Coronel Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt.

Voluntarios cubanos.

Voluntarios cubanos.

Soldados marchando por la calles de Tampa

Soldados marchando por la calles de Tampa

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »