Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Archive for the ‘Prejuicio racial’ Category

Huellas2

Acaba de ser publicado un nuevo número de la revista Huellas de Estados Unidos. Este excelente proyecto de los colegas de la Cátedra de Estados Unidos  (UBA) ya suma catorce números, todos dedicados a promover un análisis latinoamericano de la historia estadounidense. Este número incluye ensayos sobre temas muy variados: la Guerra contra la Pobreza de Lyndon B. Johnson y el movimiento negro, los afiches (posters) del famoso Wild West de Buffalo Bill  y el asesinato “moral, intelectual e ideológico” de Martin Luther King. Este número también contiene ensayos sobre temas de gran actualidad, como el endeudamiento de los  estudiantes universitarios y la recién aprobada reforma tributaria impulsada por Donald Trump. Además de una sección de reseñas y ensayos bibliográficos, este número también incluye una conferencia dictada por el gran historiador estadounidense Eric Foner titulada La historia de la libertad en el “Siglo Estadounidense” (Museo Histórico Nacional del Cabildo y de la Revolución de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 28 de septiembre de 2017).  Vayan, nuevamente, nuestras felicitaciones y agradecimientos al equipo editorial de Huellas de Estados Unidos.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez

29 de abril de 2018

Huellas.jpg

Read Full Post »

CommunityNewsletter_0

The Republican Party’s Hidden Racial History

by Timothy N. Thurber

History News Network

On September 17, lawyers from the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University joined the Texas State Conference of the NAACP, the Mexican American Legislative Caucus of the Texas House of Representatives, and others in a lawsuit to overturn a new state voter identification law (Brennan Center).

A month earlier, North Carolina enacted a statute containing several reforms, including a requirement that voters produce government-issued photo identification and a seven-day reduction in the period for early voting.

These and similar proposals in other states have sparked sharp partisan fights. Democrats believe that they violate the Voting Rights Act and constitute deliberate efforts by Republicans to suppress voting by nonwhites, students, and others who by and large do not favor the GOP. Firmly denying any intent of malice against any demographic group, Republicans insist that reforms are needed to combat voter fraud.

Conflicts over voting are as old as the republic, but they have intensified since President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election and the Supreme Court’s June 2013 decision striking down Section Four of the Voting Rights Act, which determined the states and localities required to seek federal approval for changes in election laws. “Preclearance,” as this policy was commonly known, applied primarily to the South. Republicans have tended to applaud the Court’s ruling, arguing that discrimination against nonwhites once was a problem but is now so rare that federal oversight is no longer needed. Colin Powell stands a rare exception within the GOP; he has denounced the North Carolina statute as morally wrong, based on inaccurate beliefs about the extent of fraud, and politically suicidal. The Republican Party, he contends, should be reaching out to blacks and other nonwhites.

For some observers, these developments are the latest chapter in the shift of the pro-civil rights “party of Lincoln” to a southern-controlled, states’ rights GOP that has little room for African Americans. Didn’t overwhelming majorities of congressional Republicans favor the Voting Rights Act in 1965? Yes. In the Senate, thirty Republicans backed the legislation, and only two opposed. House Republicans voted five-to-one for it. As Republicans have been noting ever since, that was a higher percentage of support than registered by Democrats.

A closer look at the events of 1965, however, reveals that the current Republican approach to voting is more similar to that of a half century ago than the final congressional tallies indicate. So, too, is the contemporary political context.

In March 1965, President Lyndon Johnson proposed legislation that greatly expanded federal authority over state election laws, particularly in the South. The bill contained a “trigger” provision that used voter participation data from 1964 to automatically suspend literacy tests in several southern states and bring those states under the preclearance requirement. This approach would relieve individuals and organizations of many of the considerable legal hurdles (and, in numerous instances, personal risk) of filing lawsuits. That case-by-case method had been tried under the 1957 and 1960 civil rights laws but had resulted in few new black voters.

Led by Everett Dirksen (Ill.), Senate Republicans allied with non-southern Democrats to defeat southerners’ efforts to preserve local autonomy, most notably their attempts to delete the trigger and preclearance provisions. Republicans also backed cloture, which ended the southern Democrats’ filibuster and ensured that the bill would pass.

House Republicans initially rallied behind legislation, offered by Gerald Ford (Mi.) and William McCulloch (Oh.), that enhanced federal jurisdiction compared to earlier civil rights laws but nevertheless preserved more state autonomy compared to Johnson’s. Their bill did not automatically ban literacy tests or contain preclearance requirements. Since the early twentieth century, Republicans had favored literacy tests in their own states and insisted upon maximizing state authority over voting rules, largely in response to high levels of immigration to the Northeast and Midwest. Low levels of black voting, Ford and McCulloch argued, might stem from factors unrelated to discrimination. The pair also pointed out that their legislation would apply to more southern states than did the president’s. Prominent civil rights groups and leaders preferred Johnson’s approach, however.

The Senate’s action, plus the sizable Democratic majority in the House, meant that the Ford-McCulloch legislation had no chance. House Republicans then fell in line with the winning side. Just one of the seventeen Republicans from the ex-Confederate states voted for Johnson’s measure. Southern Republicans, in other words, were just as eager as southern Democrats to limit Washington’s reach.

The political context of the mid-1960s also echoes the present. In 1965, Republicans were debating how to rebuild their party. The 1964 election had been a disaster not just for presidential nominee Barry Goldwater, but for the party as well. A handful of Republicans wanted to more closely align the GOP with the civil rights movement. Doing so, they argued, would increase African American support and help the party with the expanding number of whites, in the South and elsewhere, who favored a more racially egalitarian society. “We have got to get the party away from being an Anglo-Saxon Protestant white party,” Charles Percy asserted. Percy had just lost his bid to be governor of Illinois; he would be elected to the Senate in 1966. Likewise, Governor George Romney (Mi.) fired off a twelve page letter to Goldwater in which he noted that the Arizona senator had received eight million fewer votes than Richard Nixon did in 1960 and voiced alarm over the “southern-rural-white” thrust of the senator’s campaign. “The party’s need to become more broadly inclusive and attractive,” Romney emphasized, “should be obvious to anyone.”

Romney and Percy were minority voices within their party. Most Republicans continued to agree with Goldwater that the black vote was largely unwinnable and essentially irrelevant. Whites far outnumbered African Americans in most of the nation, including most of the South. As Johnson’s bill was being debated, state and local Republicans from Dixie warned northern GOP lawmakers that allying with president would undermine the party’s recent growth in Dixie. Worried that the elimination of literacy tests would mean a large influx of black voters, one Louisiana organization appealed to Nixon to lobby congressional Republicans on the South’s behalf. Illiterate African Americans, they wrote the former vice president, simply followed Democrats’ instructions or sold their votes for beer or a few dollars. The head of the Mississippi GOP predicted chaos “if large numbers of ignorant, illiterate persons are suddenly given the vote.”

Concerns over fraud were not limited to the South. Believing that the Democrats had stolen the 1960 election through fraud in Chicago and elsewhere, the RNC had launched Operation Eagle Eye in 1964. Republicans across the nation tried a variety of techniques to prove that many African American voters were ineligible. Republicans also worked to dissuade blacks from voting by spreading false information in African American neighborhoods regarding the voting process. Operation Eagle Eye flopped, but Republicans would continue to use many of these methods in the decades ahead.

Timothy N. Thurber is Associate Professor of History at Virginia Commonwealth University, and author of The Politics of Equality: Hubert H. Humphrey and the African American Freedom Struggle, and, most recently, Republicans and Race: The GOP’s Frayed Relationship with African Americans, 1945–1974.
– See more at: http://hnn.us/article/153358#sthash.xPizvkxg.dpuf

Read Full Post »

Foto

Martin Luther King durante su histórico discurso I have a dream, el 28 de agosto de 1963 Foto AP

La feroz urgencia del ahora

David Brooks

La Jornada, 2 de setiembre de 2013

Cuentan que el 28 de agosto de 1963 fue un día de verano soleado y caluroso, y que aun antes de iniciar la Marcha sobre Washington por Empleos y Libertad asustó no sólo a Washington, sino a gran parte de Estados Unidos. El sueño que estaba por proclamarse era subversivo y quien ofrecería ese mensaje era considerado el hombre desarmado más peligroso de Estados Unidos.

El gobierno de John F. Kennedy intentó persuadir a los organizadores de suspender su acto y ese día colocó 4 mil elementos antimotines en los suburbios y 15 mil en alerta; los hospitales se prepararon para recibir víctimas de la violencia potencial, y los tribunales para procesar a miles de detenidos, cuenta el historiador Taylor Branch. Colocaron agentes con instrucciones de apagar el sistema de sonido si los discursos incitaban a la sublevación. La idea de que la capital sería sitiada por oleadas masivas de afroestadunidenses provocó alarma entre la cúpula política y los medios tradicionales.

El orador principal, el reverendo Martin Luther King, era considerado un radical peligroso y estaba bajo vigilancia de la FBI de J. Edgar Hoover. El jefe de inteligencia doméstica de la FBI calificó al reverendo que encabezaba esa marcha de el negro más peligroso para el futuro de esta nación desde la perspectiva del comunismo, el negro y la seguridad nacional. Todos esperaban desorden masivo. Pero ese día cientos de miles –un tercio de ellos blancos, algo nunca visto– llegaron pacíficamente a participar en un momento que muchos dicen cambió a Estados Unidos.

“King no era peligroso para el país, sino para el statu quo… King era peligroso porque no aceptaba en silencio –ni permitía que un pueblo cansado aceptara silenciosamente ya– las cosas como estaban. Insistió en que todos nos imagináramos –soñáramos– lo que podría y debería ser”, escribió Charles Blow, columnista del New York Times.

Es allí, dicen muchos, donde se inauguró lo que se recuerda como los 60, uno de los auges democráticos (en su sentido real) más importantes de la historia estadunidense.

Hace unos días la cúpula política, la intelectualidad acomodada y los principales medios festejaron el 50 aniversario del acto con la versión oficial pulida y patriótica de la marcha que King ofreció uno de los discursos más famosos de la historia de este país, Yo tengo un sueño.

Al festejar el aniversario, se ha debatido sobre el significado de esa marcha y el discurso de King, tanto en su momento como hoy día. Algunos concluyen que el sueño de King está expresado en el hecho de que el primer presidente afroestadunidense, Barack Obama, ofreció un discurso para celebrar el aniversario en el Monumento a Lincoln, el mismo lugar donde King ofreció históricas palabras hace cinco décadas. Ahí habló de los cambios que King promovió, también reconoció que esa lucha no ha concluido.

Aunque nadie disputa los cambios dramáticos y los logros en cuanto a la lucha frontal contra la segregación institucional, tampoco se puede disputar que mucho de lo que dijo King en 1963 tendría que repetirlo 50 años después.

Hoy día hay más hombres negros encarcelados que esclavos en 1850 (según el trabajo de la extraordinaria académica Michelle Alexander); varios estados han promovido nuevas medidas para obstaculizar el acceso de las minorías a las urnas; el desempleo entre afroestadunidenses es casi el doble que entre blancos, casi igual que en 1963; el número de afroestadunidenses menores de edad que viven en la pobreza es casi el triple que el de los blancos en la misma condición; uno de cada tres niños afroestadunidenses nacidos en 2001 enfrentan el riesgo de acabar en la cárcel.

A la vez, la desigualdad económica entre pobres y ricos ha llegado a su nivel más alto desde la gran depresión. Mientras las empresas reportan ganancias récord, los ingresos de los trabajadores continúan a la baja. Más aún, una de las demandas de la marcha de 1963 fue un incremento al salario mínimo federal, que hoy se ubica en 7.25 dólares la hora, lo que es, en términos reales, inferior al que prevalecía hace 50 años, según el Instituto de Política Económica. Ejemplo de ello fue la protesta de trabajadores de restaurantes de comida rápida en más de 50 ciudades que exigieron el doble de dicho salario, la semana pasada.

Al conmemorar el aniversario, Obama destacó la brecha económica entre pobres y ricos, pero no asumió la responsabilidad de que durante su presidencia se sigue ampliando, y evitó mencionar otras políticas que ha promovido o tolerado con consecuencias terribles para comunidades minoritarias y/o pobres como las deportaciones sin precedente de inmigrantes latinoamericanos, y el sistema penal más grande y tal vez más racista del mundo.

Muchos opinan que no es justo comparar a King con Obama, ya que uno era profeta y el otro es sólo un político.

Pero la omisión más notable durante los elogios al profeta por los políticos en estos días –justo cuando la cúpula política estadunidense contempla abiertamente otro ataque militar contra otro país (Siria)– fue cualquier referencia a las guerras.

King vinculó cada vez más la lucha de los derechos civiles con la injusticia económica y, peor, con las políticas bélicas de su país. Advirtió en 1967 que la democracia estadunidense estaba amenazada por el terno gigantesco del racismo, el materialismo extremo y el militarismo. Y declaró que no podría seguir llamando a sus seguidores a emplear la no violencia si no condenaba las políticas de guerra de Washington: Sabía que nunca más podría elevar la voz contra la violencia por los oprimidos en los guetos sin primero hablar claramente ante el más grande proveedor de violencia en el mundo hoy día, mi propio gobierno.

King, en su discurso del sueño en 1963, insistió en que las injusticias se tenían que abordar en lo que llamó la feroz urgencia del ahora. Cincuenta años después, ese ahora es más urgente que nunca.

Fuente: http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2013/09/02/opinion/026o1mun

Read Full Post »