Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts Tagged ‘Historia de Estados Unidos’

 

The New York Times

 


July 2, 2013

Why the Civil War Still Matters

 

By ROBERT HICKS

FRANKLIN, Tenn. — IN his 1948 novel “Intruder in the Dust,” William Faulkner described the timeless importance of the Battle of Gettysburg in Southern memory, and in particular the moments before the disastrous Pickett’s Charge on July 3, 1863, which sealed Gen. Robert E. Lee’s defeat. “For every Southern boy fourteen years old,” he wrote, “there is the instant when it’s still not yet two o’clock on that July afternoon.”

That wasn’t quite true at the time — as the humorist Roy Blount Jr. reminds us, black Southern boys of the 1940s probably had a different take on the battle. But today, how many boys anywhere wax nostalgic about the Civil War? For the most part, the world in which Faulkner lived, when the Civil War and its consequences still shaped the American consciousness, has faded away.

Which raises an important question this week, as we move through the three-day sesquicentennial of Gettysburg: does the Civil War still matter as anything more than long-ago history?

Fifty years ago, at the war’s centennial, America was a much different place. Legal discrimination was still the norm in the South. A white, middle-class culture dominated society. The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act had not yet rewritten our demographics. The last-known Civil War veteran had died only a few years earlier, and the children and grandchildren of veterans carried within them the still-fresh memories of the national cataclysm.

All of that is now gone, replaced by a society that is more tolerant, more integrated, more varied in its demographics and culture. The memory of the war, at least as it was commemorated in the early 1960s, would seem to have no place.

Obviously, there are those for whom Civil War history is either a profession or a passion, who continue to produce and read books on the war at a prodigious rate. But what about the rest of us? What meaning does the war have in our multiethnic, multivalent society?

For one thing, it matters as a reflection of how much America has changed. Robert Penn Warren called the war the “American oracle,” meaning that it told us who we are — and, by corollary, reflected the changing nature of America.

Indeed, how we remember the war is a marker for who we are as a nation. In 1913, at the 50th anniversary of Gettysburg, thousands of black veterans were excluded from the ceremony, while white Union and Confederate veterans mingled in a show of regional reconciliation, made possible by a national consensus to ignore the plight of black Americans.

Even a decade ago, it seemed as if those who dismissed slavery as simply “one of the factors” that led us to dissolve into a blood bath would forever have a voice in any conversation about the war.

In contrast, recent sesquicentennial events have taken pains to more accurately portray the contributions made by blacks to the war, while pro-Southern revisionists have been relegated to the dustbin of history — a reflection of the more inclusive society we have become. As we examine what it means to be America, we can find no better historical register than the memory of the Civil War and how it has morphed over time.

Then again, these changes also imply that the war is less important than it used to be; it drives fewer passionate debates, and maybe — given that one side of those debates usually defended the Confederacy — that’s a good thing.

But there is an even more important reason the war matters. If the line to immigrate into this country is longer than those in every other country on earth, it is because of the Civil War.

It is true, technically speaking, that the United States was founded with the ratification of the Constitution. And it’s true that in the early 19th century it was a beacon of liberty for some — mostly northern European whites.

But the Civil War sealed us as a nation. The novelist and historian Shelby Foote said that before the war our representatives abroad referred to us as “these” United States, but after we became “the” United States. Somehow, as divided as we were, even as the war ended, we have become more than New Yorkers and Tennesseans, Texans and Californians.

And Gettysburg itself still matters, for the same reason Abraham Lincoln noted so eloquently in his famous address at the site on Nov. 19, 1863. The battle consecrated the “unfinished work” to guarantee “that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

In that way, the Civil War is less important to the descendants of those who fought in it than it is to those whose ancestors were living halfway around the globe at the time. For if you have chosen to throw your lot in with this country, the American Civil War is at the foundation of your reasons to do so.

True, we have not arrived at our final destination as either a nation or as a people. Yet we have much to commemorate. Everything that has come about since the war is linked to that bloody mess and its outcome and aftermath. The American Century, the Greatest Generation and all the rest are somehow born out of the sacrifice of those 750,000 men and boys. None of it has been perfect, but I wouldn’t want to be here without it.

Robert Hicks is the author of the novels “The Widow of the South” and “A Separate Country.”

 

Read Full Post »

AHA

La American Historical Association (AHA), la asociación de historiadores  más antigua y prestigiosa de los Estados Unidos, acaba de reinaugurar su blog AHA Today. Por la variedad de sus contenidos, éste es un recurso muy valioso para aquellos interesados en el estudio e investigación de la historia estadounidense.

 

Read Full Post »

En este interesante artículo publicado por la History News Network (HNN) el  historiador norteamericano Keith W. Olson (University of Maryland) examina la presidencia de Dwight D. Eisenhower (Ike). Olson concluye que en estos momentos en que el Partido Republicano –derrotado por Barack Obama en noviembre pasado– busca reiventarse, Eisenhower debería ser el modelo a seguir por los Republicanos. Para ello destaca el caracter moderado del que es, sin lugar dudas, el presidente Republicano más importante de la segunda mitad del siglo XX.

Republicans Should Like Ike | History News Network.

469px-Dwight_D._Eisenhower,_official_Presidential_portrait

Dwight D. Eisenhower, “Ike”

As Republican leaders continue to try to redefine their party identity they would do well to review the legacy of Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower, arguably, the most successful president since World War II. As president he faced crises and challenges both foreign and domestic, different from those of today but equal in magnitude, as well as the need to maintain national leadership.

During the 1950s the containment of the nuclear-armed Soviet Union dominated all other concerns. From the Truman administration, Eisenhower also inherited a limited war in Korea. A year later he faced a French request for military aid to save their colonial empire in Southeast Asia. Also in 1954 — and again in 1958 — he confronted tense relations with the People’s Republic of China over territorial claims and policies in the Formosa Strait.

In October 1956 three of the nation’s closest allies — the United Kingdom, France, and Israel — invaded Egypt without informing Eisenhower. The war soon involved threats from the Soviet Union. Simultaneously, the Soviets invaded Hungary to crush the Hungarian Revolution, which had overthrown the communist government in that country. A year after the Suez crisis the Soviets launched the world’s first human-made satellite, called Sputnik, to orbit the earth. While not a military threat, Sputnik sparked serious public discussion about America’s ability to compete with the Soviets.

To all of these crises Eisenhower sought non-military resolutions.

In Korea he completed a negotiated settlement, a policy the Truman administration had started. Eisenhower likewise successfully negotiated with the People’s Republic of China and aggressively pressured Britain and France into withdrawing from the Suez.

Eisenhower’s political, and economic achievements reflected stability, continuity, and moderation. As president he favored an increase in the minimum wage and extended unemployment benefits to an additional four million workers. In 1956 he broadened Social Security to include new categories of occupations and thereby added 10.5 million wage earners, including public school teachers.

Two initiatives illustrated Eisenhower’s commitment to infrastructure. The first was the St. Lawrence Seaway Act, which provided construction of locks that linked the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. In 1956 Congress enacted his proposed Federal Aid Highway Act, the largest public works project in American history. He wanted the project to finance itself through a federal tax on gas and oil with states contributing ten percent of construction cost in their states. In 1958 the National Defense Education Act provided the first major aid to higher education since 1862. Under Eisenhower the budget of the National Science Foundation more than doubled.

For Eisenhower the economy, especially the federal budget, directly related to military strength and domestic prosperity. He inherited a budget deficit of approximately $10 billion. By 1956 he balanced the first of his balanced budgets. Steadfastly he maintained high federal income tax to uphold economic health. For incomes over $400,000, the federal income tax was 91 percent (albeit with deductions). Eisenhower also systematically reduced the military budget in actual dollars as well as in percentage of the total budget through his New Look policy.

The congressional elections of 1954, 1956, and 1958 returned Democratic majorities to both houses of Congress. His 1956 re-election meant that he faced Democratic control of Congress for the last six years of his presidency.

In his farewell address Eisenhower wanted “to share a few final thoughts with you my countrymen.” After this beginning, he immediately reported that “Our people expect their president and the Congress to find essential agreement on issues of great moment, the wise resolution of which will better shape the future of the nation.” He referred to this relationship as “mutually interdependent” and continued that “In this final relations, the Congress and the administration have, on most vital issues, cooperated well, to serve the national good rather than mere partisanship, and so have assured that the business of the nation should go forward.” He concluded that “my official relationship with the Congress end[s] in a feeling, on my part, of gratitude that we have been able to do so much together.”

The American voters responded enthusiastically to Eisenhower’s leadership. In 1952 he won election by more than 6.5 million votes. Four years later he won reelection by more than 9.5 million votes. Another measure of evaluation was approval rating. Harry Truman left office with a rating of 23 percent, the lowest of any post-World War II president (until George W. Bush, that is). In Eisenhower’s last year 61 percent approved of Americans approved of his performance. His eight-year average approval was 65 percent. The trust American had in their government to do what was right all or most of the time constituted yet another category of evaluation. In 1960 the trust in government reached 70 percent.

The more scholars have researched about Eisenhower and his administration the higher their assessments. Consistently in polls he now merits eighth, ninth, or tenth rank among all presidents. In 1996, for example, The Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. poll of historians placed Eisenhower tenth. The Siena College Institute found that “experts” listed him in the top ten in its 1994, 2002, and 2010 surveys. C-SPAN’s 2009 analysis by “sixty-five historians and professional observers of the presidency” placed Eisenhower eighth.

With hindsight, of course, not all of Eisenhower’s decisions, actions, and policies win applause — but the total record is overwhelmingly favorable. In terms of legislation, international relations, and economics he left solid achievements. Voters overwhelmingly supported his presidency and scholars admire his record. During his presidency Eisenhower’s achievements and his public image contributed to high public trust in government, belief in the role of government, and ability to form bipartisan coalitions to advance the national interest. Eisenhower’s record is one Republican leaders should celebrate, not ignore.

Read Full Post »

Foner - ReconstructionEn su reunión anual celebrada en San Francisco a mediados de abril de 2013, la Organization of American Historians (OAH) rindió un merecido homenaje al historiador Eric Foner (Columbia University) por los veinticinco años de la publicación de su clásico libro Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877. Publicado en 1998 por Harper & Row, la obra de Foner  es uno de los libros imprescindibles para entender el periodo posterior a la guerra civil norteamericana.

El fin del conflicto Norte-Sur dio paso  a un problema: ¿qué hacer con los  estados sureños derrotados ? Abraham Lincoln favorecía una política generosa que permitiera la reintegración rápida de los sureños a la Unión norteamericana. Lamentablemente para éstos, Lincoln fue asesinado en 1865, lo que llevó a un intenso debate entre su sucesor, Andrew Johnson, y el Congreso federal.  Johnson creía necesario que los estados sureños fueron reincorporados a la nación norteamericana rápidamente. En el Congreso había un grupo de senadores y representantes conocidos como los radicales,  liderados por Thaddeus Stevens, que creían necesario aprovechar la derrota del Sur para reconstruir o rehacer esa región. Las diferencias entre el presidente y el Congreso desembocaron en un  conflicto directo que resultó en una victoria de los congresistas radicales. De ahí que se identifique el periodo posterior a la guerra civil como la era de la Reconstrucción.

Para celebrar los 25 años de Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, la OAH organizó una mesa  compuesta por Foner, Kate Masur (Northwestern University), Heather Andrea Williams (Univeristy of North Carolina- Chapel Hill), Gregory P. Downs (CUNY), Thavolia Glymph (Duke University) y Steve Hahn (UPenn University). Estos colegas desarrollaron un interesante y valioso intercambio sobre la importancia de la obra de Foner en el desarrollo de la historiografía norteamericana.

Comparto con mis lectores un video de esta mesa que fue preparado por The History News Network (HNN).

Read Full Post »

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Científicos del Smithsonian Institute confirman la práctica de canibalismo en Jamestown, el primer asentamiento británico exitoso en América del Norte.

Cannibalism confirmed at Jamestown | History News Network.

Read Full Post »

1360065831La British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists (BrAnca) pone a disposición de aquellos interesados en la investigación de la historia y cultura de los Estados Unidos, una interesante y valiosa lista de recursos digitales. Esta lista abarca temas tan diversos como la literatura anti-esclavista, Mark Twain y su época, una impresionante colección de  fotos de linchamientos y  una colección de panfletos afro-americanos.

Read Full Post »

Comparto con mis lectores un interesante artículo del historiador Glenn David Brasher (University of Alabama) sobre la creación del famoso regimiento de soldados negros 54 de Massachusetts, titulado Creating the ‘Glorious 54th‘”. Este artículo fue publicado en la sección Opinionator del New York Times el 11 de abril de 2013. (más…)

Read Full Post »

AHuellas2caba de salir el cuarto número de la revista on-line Huellas de los Estados Unidos. Estudios, perspectivas y debates desde América Latina. Este número está dedicado al análisis de las recientes elecciones presidenciales norteamericanas con  trabajos de Tom Engelhardt (creador de la famosa y valiosa TomDispatch.com), del puertorriqueño Raúl L. Cotto Serrano, de Valeria L. Carbone y de Fabio Nigra, entre otros.

Completan este número un grupo de ensayos dedicados a temas tan variados como esclavitud, raza e ideología,  guerra fría y criminalidad en Puerto Rico, así como también un análisis de la película  El Álamo (1960).

Nuestras felicitaciones a lo editores de Huellas de los Estados Unidos por otra aportación valiosa al estudio  de los Estados Unidos en América Latina.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, Perú, 18 de marzo de 2013

Read Full Post »

Black History Month

188093_113842875308104_6230891_n[1]En Estados Unidos se dedica el mes de febrero a conmemorar y recordar los eventos históricos  y personajes de la comunidad afroamericana. El llamado Black History Month, que se viene celebrando desde la década de 1920,  ha servido para reafirmar la identidad de los afroamericanos, subrayando sus aportaciones, recordando los abusos e injusticias a las que fueron sometidos desde que sus ascentros llegaron encadenados de África y celebrando a sus héroes y mártires. La página web de la American Historical Association nos regala una lista de recursos on-line relacionados con el Black History Month. La lista ha sido recopilada por Jessica Pritchard e incluye una impresionante selección de mapas, documentos, biografías, etc. Comparto con ustedes esta lista de recursos. No puedo dejar de preguntarme si una celebración similar sería posible en el Perú. ¿En Puerto Rico?

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima 9 de febrero de 2013

Read Full Post »

En un artículo publicado recientemente en la revista The American Conservative titulado “How we became Israel”, el historiador norteamericano Andrew Bacevich examina la israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos. El término no es mío, sino del propio Bacevich, y hace referencia al alegado creciente uso por Estados Unidos de tácticas y estrategias practicadas por el estado de Israel. Bacevich no es un autor ajeno a este blog, ya  que he reseñado varios de sus escritos porque le considero uno de los analistas más honestos y, por ende, valientes de la política exterior de su país. En el contexto de un posible ataque israelí contra Irán –que arrastraría a los Estados Unidos a una guerra innecesaria y muy peligrosa– me parece necesario reseñar este artículo, ya que analiza elementos muy importantes de las actuales relaciones israelíes-norteamericanas.

Bacevich comienza su artículo  con una reflexión sobre la paz y la violencia. Según éste,  la paz tiene significados que varían de acuerdo con el país o gobierno que los defina. Para unos, la paz es sinónimo de armonía basada en la tolerancia y el respeto. Para otros, no es más que un eufemismo para dominar. Un país comprometido con la paz recurre a la violencia como último recurso y esa había sido, según Bacevich, la actitud histórica de los Estados Unidos. Por el contrario, si un país ve la paz como sinónimo de dominio, hará un uso menos limitado de la violencia Ese es el caso de Israel desde hace mucho tiempo y lo que le preocupa al autor es que, según él,  desde fines de la guerra fría también ha sido la actitud de los Estados Unidos.  De acuerdo con Bacevich:

“As a consequence, U.S. national-security policy increasingly conforms to patterns of behavior pioneered by the Jewish state. This “Israelification” of U.S. policy may prove beneficial for Israel. Based on the available evidence, it’s not likely to be good for the United States.”

Es claro que para Bacevich la llamada israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos no es buen negocio para su nación. El autor le dedica el resto de su artículo a analizar este fenómeno.

Como parte de su análisis, el autor hace una serie de observaciones muy críticas y pertinentes sobre Israel. Comienza  examinando la visión sobre la paz del actual primer ministro israelí, partiendo de unas expresiones hechas por Benjamin Netanyahu en 2009, reclamando la total desmilitarización de la franja de Gaza y de la margen occidental del río Jordán como requisitos para un acuerdo de paz con los palestinos. Para Bacevich, estas exigencias no tienen sentido alguno porque los palestinos pueden ser una molestia para Israel, pero no constituyen una amenaza dada la enorme superioridad militar de los israelíes, cosa que se suele olvidar, añadiría yo, con demasiada facilidad y frecuencia. Bacevich concluye que para los israelíes la paz se deriva de la seguridad absoluta, basada no en la ventaja sino en la supremacía militar.

La insistencia en esa supremacía ha hecho necesario que Israel lleve a cabo lo que el autor denomina como “anticipatory action”, es decir, acciones preventivas contra lo que los israelíes han percibido como amenazas (“perceived threats”). Uno de los ejemplos que hace referencia el autor es el ataque israelí contra las facilidades nucleares iraquíes en 1981.  Sin embargo, con estas acciones los israelíes no se han limitado a defenderse, sino que  convirtieron la percepción de amenaza en oportunidad de expansión territorial. Bacevich da como ejemplos los ataques israelíes contra Egipto en 1956 y 1967 que, según él, no ocurrieron porque los egipcios tuvieran la capacidad de destruir a Israel. Tales ataques se dieron porque abrían la oportunidad de la ganancia territorial por vía de la conquista. Ganancia que en el caso de la guerra de 1967 ha tenido serias consecuencias estratégicas para Israel.

Bacevich examina otro elemento clave de la política de seguridad israelí: los asesinatos selectivos (“targeted assassinations”).  Los israelíes  han convertido la eliminación física de sus adversarios ­­–a través del uso del terrorismo, añadiría yo– en el sello distintivo del arte de la guerra israelí, eclipsando así métodos militares convencionales y dañando la imagen internacional de Israel.

Lo que  Bacevich no entiende y le preocupa, es por qué Estados Unidos han optado por seguir los pasos de Israel. Según éste, desde la administración del primer Bush, su país ha oscilado hacia la búsqueda del dominio militar global, hacia el uso de acciones militares preventivas y hacia a los asesinatos selectivos (en referencia al uso de vehículos aéreos no tripulados ­­–los llamados “drones”-  como arma antiterrorista creciente). Todo ello justificado, como en el caso de Israel,  como medida defensiva y como herramienta de seguridad nacional. Al autor se la hace difícil entender esta israelificación porque contrario a Israel, Estados Unidos es un país grande, con una gran población y sin enemigos  cercanos. En otras palabras, los norteamericanos tienen opciones y ventajas que los israelíes no poseen. A pesar de ello, Estados Unidos ha sucumbido “into an Israeli-like condition of perpetual war, with peace increasingly tied to unrealistic expectations of adversaries and would-be adversaries acquiescing in Washington’s will.”

Para Bacevich, este proceso de israelificación comenzó con la Operación Tormenta del Desierto, un conflicto tan rápido e impactante como la guerra de los siete días. Clinton contribuyó a este proceso con  intervenciones militares frecuentes (Haití, Bosnia, Serbia, Sudán, etc.). El segundo Bush –fiel creyente de la estrategia del “ Full Spectrum Dominance” (Dominación de espectro completo)– se embarcó en la liberación y transformación del mundo islámico. Bajo su liderato, Estados Unidos hizo, como Israel, uso de la guerra preventiva. De acuerdo con el autor, invadir Irak era visto por Bush y su gente como un acción preventiva contra lo que se percibía como una amenaza, pero también como  una oportunidad. Al atacar a Saddam Hussein, Bush no adoptó el concepto  de disuasión (“deterrence”) de la guerra fría, sino la versión israelí. La estrategia de “deterrence” de la guerra fría buscaba disuadir al oponente de llevar a cabo acciones bélicas mientras que la versión israelí está fundamentada en el uso desproporcionado de la fuerza. A los israelíes no les basta con amedrentar y han dejado atrás el bíblico ojo por ojo. Para ellos es necesario castigar desproporcionadamente para enviar una mensaje  de fuerza a sus enemigos. Basta recordar los 1,397 palestinos muertos en Gaza durante las tres semanas que duró la Operación Plomo Fundido a finales de 2008 y principios de 2009. De ellos, 345 eran menores de edad. [Según B’TSELEMThe Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories–, entre setiembre de 2000 y setiembre de 2012, las fuerzas de seguridad israelíes mataron a 6,500 palestinos en los territorios ocupados y a 69 en Israel. Durante ese mismo periodo, los palestinos asesinaron a 754 civiles y 343 miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad israelíes.]

De acuerdo con Bacevich, el objetivo de la administración Bush al invadir Irak era también enviar un mensaje: esto le puede pasar a quienes reten la voluntad de Estados Unidos. Desafortunadamente para Bush, la invasión y ocupación de Irak resultó un fracaso similar a la invasión israelí del Líbano en 1982.

El proceso de israelificación analizado por Bacevich tomó una nuevo giró bajo la presidencia de Obama, quien transformó el uso de los drones para asesinatos selectivos en la pieza clave de la política de seguridad nacional de Estados Unidos.

Bacevich concluye que, a pesar de que no favorece los intereses de Estados Unidos, el proceso de israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional estadounidense ya se ha completado, y que será muy difícil revertirlo dado el clima político reinante en la nación norteamericana.

Lo primero que debo señalar es que el uso del asesinato selectivo por el gobierno estadounidense como arma política no comenzó con los drones. Basta recordar los hallazgos del famoso Comité Church que en la década de 1970 investigó las actividades del aparato de inteligencia norteamericano en el Tercer Mundo. En un informe de catorce volúmenes, este comité legislativo documentó las actividades ilegales llevadas a cabo por la CIA, entre ellas, el asesinato e intento de asesinato de líderes del Tercer Mundo. ¿Cuántas veces ha intentado la CIA matar a Fidel Castro? ¿Cuántos miembros del Vietcong fueron capturados, torturados y asesinados por la CIA y sus asociados a través del Programa Phoenix en los años 1960? Lo que han hecho los drones es transformar la eliminación física de los enemigos  de Estados Unidos en un proceso a control remoto y, por ende, “seguro” para los estadounidenses.

A pesar estas críticas, considero que este ensayo es valioso por varias razones. Primero, porque refleja la creciente preocupación entre sectores académicos, militares y gubernamentales norteamericanos por la enorme influencia que ejerce Israel sobre la política exterior y doméstica de los Estados Unidos. Afortunadamente, no todos los estadounidenses creen que Estados Unidos debe apoyar a Israel incondicionalmente, especialmente, cuando es claro que tal apoyo tiene un gran costo político y económico para Estados Unidos. Segundo, porque desarrollar una discusión pública y abierta de este tema es extremadamente necesario para contrarrestar la influencia del “lobby” pro-israelí en los Estados Unidos (y a nivel mundial). En ese sentido, este ensayo cumple una función muy importante al criticar la política de seguridad de Israel desde una óptica  honesta. Bacevich no teme llamar las cosas por su nombre y no duda en describir la actual política de seguridad israelí como una basada en asesinatos selectivos y el uso desproporcionado de la fuerza, y que, además, no busca la paz, sino el dominio y la expansión territorial.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, Perú, 11 de noviembre de 2012

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »