Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Archive for the ‘Imperialismo norteamericano’ Category

imagesPaco Ignacio Taibo II es un prolifero escritor mexicano que combina muy bien la ficción (especialmente, la novela negra) y la narrativa histórica. Creador del genial investigador Belascoarán Shayne, Taibo II es autor  de un número impresionante de libros donde aborda temas de historia mexicana y latinoamericana en general. Destacan dos obras biográficas monumentales: Ernesto Guevara, también conocido como el Che (1996) y  Pancho Villa: una biografía narrativa (2006), donde enfoca dos figuras claves de la historia latinoamericana del siglo XX. Con una fuerte tendencia antisistema, no debe sorprender que Taibo II haya dedicado tiempo al rescate y análisis del movimiento anarco sindicalismo español con obras como Asturias 1934 (1980), Arcángeles: doce historias de revolucionarios herejes del siglo XX (1998) y Que sean fuego las estrellas (2015).

Me acabo de leer una de sus obras de narrativa histórica: El Álamo: una historia no apta para

Taibo

Paco Ignacio Taibo II

Hollywood ( 2011) y comparto aquí mis impresiones con mis lectores. En este corto y muy bien escrito libro, Taibo II desarrolla un efectivo trabajo  de desmitificación de la batalla del Álamo. Esta enfrentamiento entre fuerzas rebeldes texanas y efectivos del ejército mexicano fue uno de los principales episodios de la llamada revolución texana de 1836. Como bien documenta Taibo II, la  derrota de los rebeldes en el Álamo se convirtió en uno de los principales mitos fundacionales estadounidenses. A los que murieron en el Álamo se les ha convertido en símbolos del excepcionalismo estadounidense; en mártires de la libertad y la democracia. Taibo deja claro que uno de los elementos claves de la rebelión texana era la defensa de la esclavitud, no de la democracia. La especulación de tierras también jugó una papel importante en la rebelión texana. El autor baja del Olimpo al que han sido ensalzados, especialmente por Hollywood y Disney, los principales personajes estadounidenses de la batalla del Álamo: William Barret Travis, Dadid Crockett y James Bowie. Los presenta tal como lo que eran: aventureros, esclavistas, malos padres, borrachos, mentirosos, etc. Taibo  II no es menos duro con sus compatriotas, describiendo la  falta de visión y de liderato que reinó entre las tropas mexicanas, especialmente, las deficiencias de su máximo líder el General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

Aquellos interesados en la rebelión texana y en especial de la batalla del Álamo, encontrarán en este libro una visión crítica y profundamente desmitificadora de tales eventos. Quienes estén interesados en investigar estos temas, encontrarán una impresionante bibliografía que incluye fuentes tanto estadounidenses como mexicanas.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez

Lima, 13 de abril de 2018

Read Full Post »

mlkHoy, 4 de abril de 2018, se conmemoran los cincuenta años del asesinato del Reverendo Martin Luther King, Jr. en Memphis, Tennessee. El Dr. King  se encontraba en Memphis apoyando la histórica huelga de los recogedores de basura, que en su mayoría eran afroamericanos. Su asesinato desató una ola de violencia urbana y apagó una de las voces más críticas de la sociedad estadounidense de la década de 1960.

Creo que la mejor forma de recordar al Dr. King en un día como hoy, es compartiendo su análisis de tres problemas fundamentales de su era y de total actualidad: el militarismo, el racismo y la pobreza. El 31 de agosto de 1967, el Dr. King pronunció uno de sus  más importantes discursos ante la National Conference on New Politics. Conocido como The Three Evils of Society Address, este discurso formó parte de su People´s Poor Campaign, dirigida a combatir la injusticia económica más de allá de límites raciales.

Para oir este importante discurso ir aquí.

 

Read Full Post »

Princeton University ha publicado un libro cuya lectura parece obligatoria: American Empire A Global History. Escrito por el historiador británico A. G. Hopkins, este libro interpreta la evolución del imperio estadounidense desde una perspectiva global. Hopkins cuestiona la idea del excepcionalismo al examinar  la historia estadounidense desde una óptica internacional. Comparto con mis lectores esta “introducción” a su obra escrita por Hopkins y que fuera publicada en la bitácora Not Even Past.

The American “Empire” Reconsidered

by A. G. Hopkins

Whether commentators assert that the United States is resurgent or in decline, it is evident that the dominant mood today is one of considerable uncertainty about the standing and role of the “indispensable nation” in the world. The triumphalism of the 1990s has long faded; geopolitical strategy, lacking coherence and purpose, is in a state of flux. Not Even Past, or perhaps Not Ever Past, because the continuously unfolding present prompts a re-examination of approaches to history that fail to respond to the needs of the moment, as inevitably they all do.

This as good a moment as any to consider how we got “from there to here” by stepping back from the present and taking a long view of the evolution of U.S. international relations. The first reaction to this prospect might be to say that it has already been done – many times. Fortunately (or not), the evidence suggests otherwise. The subject has been studied in an episodic fashion that has been largely devoid of continuity between 1783 and 1914, and becomes systematic and substantial only after 1941.
There are several ways of approaching this task. The one I have chosen places the United States in an evolving Western imperial system from the time of colonial rule to the present. To set this purpose in motion, I have identified three phases of globalisation and given empires a starring role in the process. The argument holds that the transition from one phase to another generated the three crises that form the turning points the book identifies. Each crisis was driven by a dialectic, whereby successful expansion generated forces that overthrew or transformed one phase and created its successor.

The first phase, proto-globalisation, was one of mercantilist expansion propelled by Europe’s leading military-fiscal states. Colonising the New World stretched the resources of the colonial powers, produced a European-wide fiscal crisis at the close of the eighteenth century, and gave colonists in the British, French, and Spanish empires the ability, and eventually the desire, to claim independence. At this point, studies of colonial history give way to specialists on the new republic, who focus mainly on internal considerations of state-building and the ensuing struggle for liberty and democracy. Historians of empire look at the transition from colonial rule rather differently by focussing on the distinction between formal and effective independence. The U.S. became formally independent in 1783, but remained exposed to Britain’s informal political, economic and cultural influences. The competition between different visions of an independent polity that followed mirrored the debate between conservatives and reformers in Europe after 1789, and ended, as it did in much of Europe, in civil war.

The second phase, modern globalisation, which began around the mid-nineteenth century, was characterised by nation-building and industrialisation. Agrarian elites lost their authority; power shifted to urban centres; dynasties wavered or crumbled. The United States entered this phase after the Civil War at the same time as new and renovated states in Europe did. The renewed state developed industries, towns, and an urban labor force, and experienced the same stresses of unemployment, social instability, and militant protest in the 1880s and 1890s as Britain, France, Germany and other developing industrial nation-states. At the close of the century, too, the U.S. joined other European states in contributing to imperialism, which can be seen as the compulsory globalisation of the world. The war with Spain in 1898 not only delivered a ready-made insular empire, but also marked the achievement of effective independence. By 1900, Britain’s influence had receded. The United States could now pull the lion’s tail; its manufactures swamped the British market; its culture had shed its long-standing deference. After 1898, too, Washington picked up the white man’s burden and entered on a period of colonial rule that is one of the most neglected features of the study of U.S. history.

The third phase, post-colonial globalisation, manifested itself after World War II in the process of decolonisation. The world economy departed from the classical colonial model; advocacy of human rights eroded the moral basis of colonial rule; international organisations provided a platform for colonial nationalism. The United States decolonised its insular empire between 1946 and 1959 at the same time as the European powers brought their own empires to a close. Thereafter, the U.S. struggled to manage a world that rejected techniques of dominance that had become either unworkable or inapplicable. The status of the United States was not that of an empire, unless the term is applied with excessive generality, but that of an aspiring hegemon. Yet, Captain America continues to defend ‘freedom’ as if the techniques of the imperial era remained appropriate to conditions pertaining in the twenty-first century.

This interpretation inverts the idea of “exceptionalism” by showing that the U.S. was fully part of the great international developments of the last three centuries. At the same time, it identifies examples of distinctiveness that have been neglected: the U.S. was the first major decolonising state to make independence effective; the only colonial power to acquire most of its territorial empire from another imperial state; the only one to face a significant problem of internal decolonisation after 1945. The discussion of colonial rule between 1898 and 1959 puts a discarded subject on the agenda of research; the claim that the U.S. was not an empire after that point departs from conventional wisdom.

The book is aimed at U.S. historians who are unfamiliar with the history of Western empires, at historians of European empires who abandon the study the U.S. between 1783 and 1941, and at policy-makers who appeal to the ‘lessons of history’ to shape the strategy of the future.

A.G. Hopkins, American Empire: A Global History


 

Read Full Post »

TupacAmaruVelascoEl de 3 octubre de 1968 las fuerzas armadas peruanas derrocaron al Presidente Fernando Belaúnde Terry, dando inicio al Gobierno Revolucionario de las Fuerzas Armadas (GRFA),  uno de los experimentos sociales, políticos y económicos más importantes en América Latina durante la segunda mitad del siglo XX. En los doce años que ejerció el poder, el  GRFA realizó importantes políticas y reformas: expropió varias corporaciones estadounidenses, buscó rehacer el orden diplomático interamericano establecido  en el Tratado de Río, pidió el fin del embargo contra Cuba, defendió la aplicación del límite de las 200 millas náuticas y estableció relaciones diplomáticas y comerciales con  países  comunistas.

Los militares peruanos también participaron activamente en el Movimiento de Países No-alineados, compraron cientos de millones de dólares en armamento soviético, llevaron a cabo una reforma agraria y pusieron en marcha un agresivo programa económico  que buscaba fomentar el desarrollo y la independencia del Perú.

El gobierno militar peruano adoptó un discurso anti-imperialista que ­–unido a sus medidas económicas, políticas y diplomáticas– le llevó a un interesante enfrentamiento con el gobierno de los Estados Unidos, convirtiéndose en un dolor de cabeza para las autoridades estadounidenses.

La mayoría de quienes han estudiado el GRFA se han concentrado en el análisis de temas socioeconómicos y políticos locales, prestando poca atención a elementos diplomáticos e internacionales, especialmente, a la interacción de los militares peruanos con el gobierno de Estados Unidos.  Quienes han superado esta limitación se han concentrado en el análisis de las relaciones del gobierno militar con las instituciones tradicionales de la política exterior estadounidense (Presidente, Departamento de Estado, etc.), ignorando el papel que jugó el Congreso norteamericano en este drama.

histcrit.2018.issue-67.coverEl último número de la revista Historia critica, una publicación de la Universidad de los Andes en Colombia,  contiene un artículo de mi autoría titulado “The United States Congress and the Peruvian Revolution, 1968-1975″. El objetivo de mi articulo es    aportar al estudio de las relaciones peruano-estadounidenses, analizando el papel que jugó el Congreso -una de las instituciones claves del sistema político estadounidense- durante la etapa más radical del GRFA.

Aquellos interesados en estos temas pueden descargar el artículo aquí.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, 27 de enero de 2018

 

Read Full Post »

 

Con un nuevo formato y dos nuevos miembros (Joanne Freeman de Yale University y Nathan Connolly de Johns Hopkins University), el podcast  Backstory no ha perdido la calidad  a que nos tiene acostumbrados. Muestra de ello su más reciente episodio, donde Bryan Ayers conversa con uno de los estrategas políticos más importantes de la historia estadounidense: Mr. Karl Rove.

 

Karl Rove Photo and Book 10182015

Oriundo del estado de Colorado, Rove fue el principal asesor y estratega político del Presidente George W. Bush. Lo que muchos desconocen es que Rove es un estudioso  de la historia estadounidense y autor de un libro sobre la elección de 1896 titulado The Triumph of William McKinley: Why the Election of 1896 Still Matters (Simon & Schuster: 2016). En esta obra Rove analiza la elección de Mckinley  como una clave para el dominio Republicano en los primeros treinta años del siglo XX. Rove también rescata la figura de McKinley, un presidente usualmente caracterizado como un líder opaco y poco carismático, para presentarle como un gran unificador nacional.

Es interesante como a lo largo de toda la entrevista Rove enfatiza la utilidad de la historia como herramienta tanto de análisis como de estrategia política. Aquellos interesados en la historia política estadounidense encontrarán en esta entrevista un análisis de uno de sus actores más destacados. Los que como yo tenían una visión negativa de Mr. Rove, se tropezaran con un conservador articulado y sensato.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez

Lima, 10 de setiembre de 2017

Read Full Post »

ConstitutionalTras el gran éxito de Presidential, la periodista del Washington Post Lilliam Cunningham vuelve a la carga con un nuevo podcast de historia estadounidense. Siguiendo la sugerencia de uno sus oyentes, Cunningham ha lanzado  un nuevo proyecto llamado Constitutional, donde analiza la constitución de Estados Unidos. Tras comenzar enfocando el preámbulo de la constitución, Cunningham ha dedicado los próximos tres episodios a analizar -con la ayuda de historiadores- la relación de la constitución con temas tan importantes como raza y nacionalidad. Recomiendo este podcast a todos aquellos interesados en la historia política estadounidense.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez

24 de agosto de 2017

.

Read Full Post »

Es con gran placer que anuncio la salida del número  12 de la Revista on-line “Huellas de Estados Unidos. Estudios, Perspectivas y debates desde América Latina“.  Una buena parte de sus artículos están dedicados al análisis de la victoria de Donald Trump. Felicito nuevamente a los editores de la revista por su trabajo promoviendo, el tan necesario estudio de los Estados Unidos en América Latina.

………………………………………….

………………………………………….

……………………………………………

………………………………………….

……………………………………………

……………………………………………

………………………………………….

………………………………………….

………………………………………….

………………………………………….

………………………………………….

………………………………………….

…….

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »