Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts Tagged ‘Nativism’

The Nativist Origins of Philippines Independence

Richard Baldoz

Truthout April 1, 2014

The flag of the United States is lowered while the flag of the Philippines is raised during the Independence Day ceremonies on July 4, 1946. (Photo: <a href=" http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/09/Philippine_Independence%2C_July_4_1946.jpg" target="_blank"> via Philippine Presidential Museum and Library/a>)

The flag of the United States is lowered while the flag of the Philippines is raised during the Independence Day ceremonies on July 4, 1946. (Photo via Philippine Presidential Museum and Library)


This week marks the 80th anniversary of the passage of the Tydings-McDuffie Act, which established conditions for the United States to grant the Philippines its independence after nearly five decades of American rule. The circumstances surrounding the passage of this historic legislation serve as a reminder of our nation’s lamentable experiment with overseas empire-building and a reckoning with this imperial past help us to understand one of the most visible legacies of this complicated relationship, the large number of Filipinos currently living in the United States.

The act often was hailed as evidence of the benevolent character of the American imperial project, which was motivated by the desire to “uplift and civilize” the native population who had suffered under more than three centuries of Spanish domination. The US annexed the Philippines in 1899 in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War, despite objections from Filipino leaders who already had formed an independent government. American statesmen, however, declared Filipinos unfit for self-rule. Only after a protracted period of intensive colonial tutelage would Filipinos be allowed to run their own affairs. Adding insult to injury, American officials argued (without irony) that the US was duty-bound to take possession of the islands to protect them from the nefarious designs of self-serving foreign powers.

The eventual withdrawal of US sovereignty over the Philippines was far from a foregone conclusion that vindicated the American way of empire, and the origins of the Tydings-McDuffie Act offer a far more complex story involving racial animus, economic competition and the entanglement of domestic and foreign policy objectives.

Filipinos, as American colonial subjects, were exempted from restrictive laws that barred immigration from Asia countries. The exponential growth of the agribusiness sector in Hawaii and the West Coast during the early 20th century spurred a large demand for cheap, flexible labor. Agribusiness concerns actively recruited Filipinos to do field and cannery work previously carried out by Chinese and Japanese immigrants.

Filipino immigration to the United States during the early decades of the 20th century generated significant controversy, especially on the West Coast, where their arrival was characterized as the “third Asiatic invasion” (following on the heels of the Chinese and Japanese “invasions”). Following the popular cultural script of the period, the newcomers were accused of stealing jobs from white citizens, spreading disease and displaying a propensity for criminality. The fact that the first wave of Filipino immigrants was made up overwhelmingly of young male laborers without traditional family moorings was viewed as a budding social problem.

Beginning in the late 1920s, the powerful West Coast nativist lobby pressed federal officials to enact legislation barring the entry of Filipinos. These efforts failed to make headway in Congress, with many lawmakers expressing concern about the diplomatic fallout that might result from excluding Filipino immigrants while they lived under the American flag. Key Congressional leaders worried that such a course of action would violate international norms followed by other imperial powers allowing colonial subjects unimpeded access to the “mother country.”

The failure of the federal government to take action compelled nativist leaders to ratchet up their campaign, hoping to galvanize greater public support for exclusion. Alarmist rhetoric accusing Filipino immigrants of brazenly defying the color line by pursuing social relationships with white women attracted significant media attention. Filipinos, moreover, were charged with exhibiting a penchant for labor militancy that threatened to upend the traditional balance of power between agribusiness and immigrant workers.

Moral panics about interracial sex and political subversion soon spurred public action most visibly manifested in a series of race riots and vigilante campaigns targeting Filipino immigrants on the West Coast in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Violence and acrimony directed at the “invaders” attracted national media attention and eventually prompted Congress to hold hearings on the “Filipino problem.” The nativist lobby used the platform to press its case for exclusion, soliciting support from Southern Congressional representatives, drawing comparisons between Filipino and African-American men’s alleged ardor for white women. Legislation aimed at restricting Filipino immigration stalled again, with the Philippines status as a US possession remaining the chief sticking point.

Nativist leaders quickly adopted a new strategy, embracing the cause of Philippine independence in the early 1930s. Once the Philippines was granted its sovereignty, they reasoned, Filipinos would no longer be exempt from restrictive immigration quotas. While there had long been a vocal base of support in Congress for Philippine independence, it was opposed by powerful constituencies in the federal government who viewed the archipelago as a valuable geo-strategic asset.

The nativist lobby entered into a makeshift coalition with two other important groups pushing for independence. The first was Midwestern agricultural interests, concerned about the importation of inexpensive Philippine products that entered the US duty-free because of the colonial status of the islands. Domestic sugar beet growers feared competition from cheap Philippine cane sugar, and dairy farmers saw coconut oil (formerly a key ingredient in margarine) as hurting the demand for butter. Their political agenda ran parallel to that of the nativists, except they advocated independence as a way to restrict the free entry of Philippine goods, rather than Filipino labor.

Filipino nationalists made up another segment of the independence coalition. Their demands for self-determination pre-dated the Spanish-American War, and indignity surrounding racist treatment and violence against Filipinos living in the US gave their campaign a renewed urgency. While Filipino leaders recognized that they their political allies had less-than-noble intentions, they believed that a Faustian pact was the price to pay for freedom.

The Tydings-McDuffie Act was signed into law in March 1934, despite opposition from the State Department and War Department. The act bore the hallmarks of the various interest groups involved in its passage. In a nod to the opposition, the Philippines would have to complete a 10-year probationary period before the US would formally relinquish its sovereignty over the islands. The status of Filipinos remained largely unchanged during this so-called “Commonwealth” period. They continued to “owe allegiance” to the United States while the Philippines remained under US administrative jurisdiction.

Although independence was delayed for 10 years, two key sections of the act went into effect immediately. Tariffs targeting Philippine sugar, coconut oil and other products were implemented quickly – a clear victory for Midwestern agribusiness interests. In addition, Filipinos immediately were subject to restrictive immigration laws barring the admission of other Asian groups. The Philippines was granted a token quota of 50 immigrants per year, the lowest number allotted to any country in the world. Nativist leaders were quick to take credit for the harsh new quota, believing that it reflected the prevailing racial animus towards Filipinos in the United States.

The unsavory political forces that helped push the Tydings-McDuffie Act through Congress were not lost on Filipino leaders, who observed that the act was as much about the “independence of America from the Philippines” as it was about independence for the Philippines. Filipinos living in the United States faced an uncertain future and remained a feature of everyday life, a fact evidenced by the passage of the Filipino Repatriation Act in 1935, which aimed to “relocate” resident Filipinos back to their homeland.

The Philippines’ march to independence was thrown into peril halfway through its 10-year probation, when Japan attacked the Philippines on December 8, 1941. Interestingly, a little-known provision of the Tydings-McDuffie Act empowered the president of the United States to conscript all Philippine military personnel into the US armed forces. President Roosevelt did just that and approximately 200,000 Filipinos eventually would serve under US military command during World War II.

The Allied war victory ensured that Philippine independence was put back on track and the war-torn country finally was granted its sovereignty on July 4, 1946. The date was a conscious choice made by US officials that would serve as a permanent reminder of America’s lasting influence over the islands. The large and growing Filipino population currently residing in the United States is one enduring consequence of that influence. Filipinos have long been coveted by American employers because of their English language skills and familiarity with US culture. These traits, of course, are the inheritance of empire and a reminder that Filipinos came to the United States only after Americans came to the Philippines.

Richard Baldoz is an assistant professor of sociology at Oberlin College and the author of the award-winning book The Third Asiatic Invasion: Empire and Migration in Filipino America, 1898-1946.

RELATED STORIES

The African-American Connection to the Philippines

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., The Michigan Citizen | Op-Ed

From the Philippines to the NSA: 111 Years of the US Surveillance State

By Mike Morey, Occupy.com | News Analysis

Filipino Gov. Misused Public Funds as People Suffer From Post-Typhoon Devastation

By Jessica Desvarieux, The Real News Network | Video Interview

Read Full Post »

Aunque han existido más de dos partidos nacionales de manera simultánea, la historia política de los Estados Unidos ha estado caracterizada por la presencia dominante de dos partidos políticos. El nombre y la orientación política de estos dos partidos  ha variado a lo largo de la historia estadounidense.

El bipartidismo estadounidense nace en los primeros años de vida independiente de la nación norteamericana bajo la influencia de los eventos asociados a la Revolución Francesa. La crisis internacional provocada por los acontecimientos en Europa atrapó a los Estados Unidos entre las dos principales naciones en lucha: Francia y Gran Bretaña. La joven y aún vulnerable república norteamericana se vio amenazada por un conflicto del que no era responsable ni podía controlar.

En este contexto, la lucha entre dos grupos políticos provocó el desarrollo de los primeros partidos políticos norteamericanos: el Partido Federalista y el Partido Republicano. Los federalistas estaban liderados por Alexander Hamilton y se identificaban con los intereses de la región más urbana y comercial del país, el noreste. Éstos proponían el desarrollo de los Estados Unidos como un país manufacturero y comercial, por lo que defendían la creación de un banco nacional, el pago de la deuda nacional y el cobro de aranceles a los productos importados. A nivel internacional, los federalistas veían con recelo los eventos de la Revolución Francesa y no escondían sus simpatías por Gran Bretaña. Los republicanos estaban liderados por Thomas Jefferson y representaban los intereses del sur esclavista y agrario. Éstos favorecían el desarrollo de una economía agrícola de pequeños propietarios y se oponían a los aranceles y a la creación de un banco nacional porque creían que afectarían los intereses de los ciudadanos comunes. A nivel internacional, Jefferson y sus seguidores simpatizaban con la Francia revolucionaria y manifestaban una actitud claramente anti-británica.

Thomas Jefferson

Estos dos partidos se enfrentaron por primera vez en las elecciones de 1796. Los federalistas resultaron victoriosos, ganando la mayoría del Congreso y eligiendo a John Adams como el segundo presidente de los Estados Unidos. Éste mantuvo una política pro-británica, provocando serios problemas con Francia. En las elecciones de 1800 resultó electo Jefferson presidente, marcando el inicio de un dominio político republicano sobre el gobierno federal.

Ambos partidos mantuvieron una dura lucha hasta que la guerra de 1812 conllevó el fin del Partido Federalista. Los fracasos sufridos por las fuerzas norteamericanas durante la guerra –unida al costo económico del conflicto– provocaron críticas y una oposición popular, especialmente, donde los federalistas eran más poderosos: los estados de la zona de Nueva Inglaterra, al noreste del país. Dado que eran la principal fuerza política de la región, los federalistas lideraron la oposición a la guerra. En diciembre de 1814, un grupo de delegados de los estados de Nueva Inglaterra se reunieron en la ciudad de Hartford en el estado de Connecticut, para discutir las quejas contra la guerra y el gobierno del entonces Presidente James Madison, un republicano. Como parte de los debates de la convención se discutió la posibilidad de la secesión, es decir, de que la región se independizara y formara un nuevo país. Aunque los seguidores de esta idea eran una minoría, la euforia nacionalista provocada por la victoria de Andrew Jackson en la batalla de Nueva Orleans en 1814, hizo que los participantes de la Convención de Hartford fueron considerados unos traidores, lo que condenó a muerte al Partido Federalista.

La crisis y eventual desaparición del Partido Federalista llevó a los republicanos a dominar el escenario político nacional hasta 1824. Ese año las elecciones presidenciales fueron disputadas por cinco candidatos: John Quincy Adams, John C. Calhoun, William Crawford, Henry Clay y Andrew Jackson. Este último obtuvo la mayoría de votos populares, pero no la cantidad de votos electorales necesaria, por lo que la Cámara de Representantes tuvo que decidir entre los tres candidatos con más votos: Jackson, Adams y Crawford. Adams resultó electo con el apoyo de Clay, entonces Presidente de la Cámara, provocando las críticas de Jackson, quien fundó un nuevo partido político, el Demócrata.

En 1828 Jackson ganó las elecciones convirtiéndose en séptimo presidente de los Estados Unidos. El estilo personalista y enérgico de Jackson provocaron duras críticas entre sus opositores, que le acusaron de ser un dictador. En 1834, un grupo de legisladores se unieron para oponerse Jackson. Éstos se autodenominaron como los “whigs”, en alusión a los británicos que se opusieron a las arbitrariedades del rey Jorge III durante el periodo revolucionario. Los whigs alegaban que ellos se enfrentaban a un presidente que se comportaba como un rey tiránico y abusivo. Liderados por Calhoun, Clay y Daniel Webster, los whigs se convirtieron en una fuerza política coherente y organizada que defendía que el gobierno estuviese controlado por hombres capaces. En otras palabras, los whigs defendían un elitismo político basado en el talento: que los “mejores” gobernaran al país. A nivel económico, favorecían la libre empresa, la iniciativa privada, la expansión del gobierno federal y el estimulo al desarrollo industrial y comercial del país. Según ellos, Estados Unidos debía convertirse en una nación industrial con un comercio vigoroso El tema de la expansión al oeste era uno delicado para los whigs, pues temían que el crecimiento territorial produjera inestabilidad política. Rechazaban la lucha de clases, alegando que el crecimiento económico redundaría en beneficios para todos los norteamericanos, fuesen éstos agricultores, trabajadores o dueños de las fábricas.

Aunque los whigs tuvieron más simpatías entre los comerciantes y empresarios del noreste, también hubo whigs entre los sureños, quienes apoyaron el nuevo partido por razones muy especificas. Los whigs sureños no simpatizaban con el cobro de aranceles a las importaciones, pero sí tenían inversiones en bancos y ferrocarriles y, por ende, les atraía el programa económico del partido. Otros eran hacendados que querían acabar con el poder político que habían alcanzado los granjeros blancos libres durante la presidencia de Jackson. Algunos whigs sureños se había unido al partido en reacción a la actitud que asumió Jackson con relación a los derechos de los estados y el caso de Carolina del Sur y la teoría de la invalidación en 1828. En el oeste, los whigs fueron apoyados por una clase comercial emergente que favorecía el programa de mejoras internas y que estaba compuesta por inmigrantes.

Los seguidores de Jackson estaban agrupados bajo el Partido Demócrata. La filosofía de éstos estuvo influida por las políticas y acciones de Jackson. De ahí que éstos favorecieran limitar la intervención económica del gobierno federal, promovieran los derechos de los estados y se declararan defensores de los trabajadores, los granjeros y los “hombres honrados”, y enemigos de los monopolios, los aristócratas y los corruptos. Contrario a los whigs, los demócratas favorecían la expansión territorial porque creían que ésta aumentaría las oportunidades para los norteamericanos comunes. Los demócratas defendían la remoción y el traslado de los indios. Su base de apoyo político estaba entre los pequeños comerciantes y trabajadores del noreste y los agricultores sureños. Contrario a los líderes whigs, los líderes demócratas eran menos ricos y de origen popular.

Whigs y demócratas compitieron por el control del gobierno entre 1836 y 1852, alternándose en la presidencia. En 1836 fue electo presidente Martin Van Buren, un demócrata. Cuatro años más tarde fue electo William H. Harrison, un whig. En 1844, los demócratas volvieron a la Casa Blanca con la elección de James K. Polk, pero fueron derrotados en 1848 por Zachary Taylor, un whig veterano de la guerra con México. En el año 1852 se dio el último enfrentamiento entre estos dos partidos y los demócratas lograron la victoria con la elección de Franklin Pierce como décimo cuarto presidente de los Estados Unidos.

En la década de 1840 surgió un partido anti-inmigrante conocido como el Partido Americano, también conocido como el Partido Know Nothing. El origen de este nombre está en el hecho de cuando alguien les preguntaba algo a alguno sus miembros, éste respondía que no sabían nada (“know nothing”) y de ahí les quedo el calificativo. El nuevo partido contaba con el apoyo de pequeños granjeros, hombres de negocios modestos y gente trabajadora. Los “Know Nothings” poseían una rara combinación entre un fuerte nacionalismo anti-inmigrante conocido como “nativism” y anti-esclavismo, pues se oponían abiertamente a la inmigración de irlandeses y alemanes católicos (como también de los chinos) y su segmento norteño rechazaba la esclavitud. Su fuerte anti-catolicismo les llevaba a plantear la existencia de una conspiración entre el Papa y los propietarios de plantaciones esclavistas contra la democracia norteamericana. La llegada de miles de pobres inmigrantes católicos era, según ellos, parte de este complot, que amenazaba la idea que tenían los Know Nothings de los Estados Unidos como una sociedad protestante de individuos libres e iguales.

Aunque  logró algunas victorias electorales en ciudades de la zona de Nueva Inglaterra, el Partido Know Nothing entró en crisis como consecuencia de las divisiones internas, especialmente, sobre el tema de la esclavitud y eventualmente desapareció.

El tema de la esclavitud no afectó solamente a los Know Nothing. Los debates sobre el futuro de la esclavitud que caracterizaron la década de 1850 tuvieron serias consecuencias sobre otros partidos políticos. En 1854 fue aprobada por el Congreso la Ley Kansas-Nebraska revocando el Acuerdo de Missouri que prohibía la esclavitud al sur de paralelo 36º30´, permitiendo así que los territorios a sur de ese paralelo fuesen organizados sobre la base de la soberanía popular. Los residentes de los territorios de Kansas y Nebraska decidirían a través del voto si eran territorios, y por ende, estados esclavistas o no.

La ley Kansas-Nebraska tuvo consecuencias desastrosas para el sistema político norteamericano, pues destruyó al Partido Whig y dañó severamente al Demócrata. Los whigs y demócratas opuestos a la ley la denunciaron como un esfuerzo más para imponer la esclavitud en el país. Estos abandonaron sus respectivos partidos y se unieron a los “free-soilers” –un partido político opuesto a la expansión de la esclavitud fundado en 1848– y los grupos abolicionistas para fundar, en 1854, un nuevo partido político, el Republicano. Este partido estaba formado por grupos muy diferentes unidos por su rechazo de la esclavitud. Los miembros del Partido Republicano afirmaban los valores republicanos de libertad e individualismo, y consideraban que la esclavitud negaba ambos. La lucha entre republicanos y demócratas fue intensa en el periodo previo a la guerra civil.

El detonante de la guerra civil fue la victoria en las elecciones presidenciales de 1860 del Partido Republicano y de su candidato Abraham Lincoln. Estas elecciones jugaron un papel decisivo en la historia de los Estados Unidos. La victoria de Lincoln fue facilitada por la división del Partido Demócrata. La lucha por la candidatura presidencial llevó a los demócratas a una crisis interna y a la destrucción de ese partido. Como el Partido Demócrata agrupaba tanto a sureños como norteños, había jugado un importante papel como instrumento de conciliación durante las crisis regionales que vivió el país en la década de 1850. Su destrucción no sólo facilitó la victoria de Lincoln, sino que dejó a la nación sin una herramienta útil para enfrentar la crisis regional más severa de su historia: la secesión del Sur.

Los delegados del Partido Demócrata se reunieron en abril de 1860 en la ciudad de Charleston, Carolina del Sur, para elegir su candidato a la presidencia. El Senador Stephen Douglas contaba con una mayoría de votos, pero no tenía el apoyo necesario de dos terceras partes de los delegados. Para ello necesitaba el apoyo de los delegados sureños, que le exigieron garantizar la protección de la esclavitud en los territorios. Para Douglas, ello conllevaba violar su apoyo histórico a la doctrina de la soberanía popular, por lo que declinó la oferta de los sureños. Sin el apoyo de los sureños, la convención no pudo elegir un candidato. En junio de 1860, los delegados demócratas se reunieron nuevamente en la ciudad de Baltimore, Maryland, para intentar resolver las diferencias entre las facciones norteñas y sureñas y elegir un candidato a la presidencia. Esta segunda convención fue un total fracaso, pues los delegados sureños abandonaron la asamblea y luego nominaron John C. Breckinridge como su candidato presidencial. Sin la participación de los demócratas sureños, los norteños nominaron a Douglas su candidato presidencia, lo que selló la división y destrucción del Partido Demócrata.

Por su parte los republicanos nominaron a Abraham Lincoln como su candidato presidencial. Para complicar aún más la situación política, algunos whigs sureños se unieron a nativistas y crearon el Partido Unión Constitucional, con John Bell como su candidato a presidente.

Durante la campaña electoral, Breckinridge apoyó la extensión de la esclavitud en los territorios, mientras Lincoln se manifestó claramente a favor de su exclusión. Douglas buscó mantener un punto medio con su apoyo a la doctrina de la soberanía popular. Bell también buscó un compromiso, pero de forma más vaga que Douglas. Douglas fue el único candidato que alertó con insistencia sobre el peligro de la secesión.

Esta elección histórica produjo una enorme participación popular, pues votó el 81% de los electores. La división de los demócratas posibilitó la victoria de Lincoln, quien obtuvo 180 votos electorales y 1,865,593 votos populares. Breckinridge llegó en segundo lugar con 72 votos electorales y 848,356 votos populares. Bell llegó en tercer lugar con 592,906 votos populares y 39 votos electorales. Los 1,382,713 votos populares que obtuvo Douglas sólo le permitieron ganar dos estados y acumular 12 votos electorales. El resultado de la elección fue de un marcado regionalismo, pues todo el sur voto por Breckinridge, mientras Lincoln ganó en todos los estados libres de esclavos. Tan regionalista fue esta elección que en diez estados sureños el nombre de Lincoln ni siquiera apareció en la papeleta electoral.

Elecciones de 1860

El trauma de la guerra civil marcó el desarrollo de los partidos políticos en los años de la posguerra. El Partido Democrático resurgió con un claro control de los estados sureños, mientras que el Republicano controlaba el Norte. Entre 1860 y 1894, los republicanos ganaron 8 de las10 elecciones presidenciales que se celebraron. Sin embargo, no pudieron romper el dominio demócrata en el sur, y prueba de ello es que entre 1880 y 1924, ningún candidato republicano a la presidencia ganó ni uno solo de los estados que fueron parte de la Confederación.

Uno de los fenómenos políticos más importantes de la segunda mitad del siglo XIX fue el surgimiento de un partido de los granjeros norteamericanos. El nacimiento de este nuevo partido político estuvo directamente vinculado a los cambios económicos que experimentó la sociedad estadounidense en las últimas décadas de siglo XIX. Los granjeros norteamericanos comenzaron a organizarse a partir de la década de 1860 en respuesta a los problemas que enfrentaban, especialmente, con los precios de sus productos. El gran crecimiento de la agricultura a nivel mundial provocó la caída de los precios y, por ende, de los ingresos de los agricultores. Los agricultores tenían también problemas con los bancos por los altos intereses que pagaban por sus préstamos e hipotecas de sus fincas. En otras palabras, los granjeros vieron sus ingresos reducir, haciendo difícil el pago de sus hipotecas y poniendo en riesgo su supervivencia económica y, por ende, su forma de vida.

La dependencia en los ferrocarriles era otro serio problema que enfrentaban los agricultores, dado que la única forma rentable que tenían de enviar sus productos a los mercados era través de los trenes y las compañías ferrocarrileras se aprovechaban de esto cobrándoles tarifas abusivas.

La primera organización nacional de agricultores fue fundada en 1867 en la zona del medio oeste y fue conocida como los “Patrons of Husbandry”. También conocida como el “Grange” –otro palabra en inglés para granja– esta organización creció rápidamente entre los agricultores de las grandes planicies y entre agricultores al oeste y sur del río Misisipi, afectados todos por el descenso de los precios de sus productos. En poco tiempo el Grange llegó a tener 1,500,000 miembros.

El Grange concentró sus ataques contra los bancos, los ferrocarriles y los productores de maquinaria agrícola. A los bancos se les acusaba de cobrar intereses demasiado altos por sus préstamos. A los fabricantes de maquinaria, les acusaban de abusar de los agricultores vendiendo sus productos a precios más altos en los Estados Unidos que en Europa. A las compañías ferrocarrileras le acusaron de sobornar a legisladores estatales para cobrarle a los granjeros tarifas discriminatorias, ya que cobraban más caro por transportar productos agrícolas en rutas corta que en las largas. Gracias a la presión de los miembros del Grange varios estados del medio oeste aprobaron leyes estableciendo tarifas máximas de transporte ferroviario.

En la década de 1870 la economía estadounidense entró en una crisis económica que afectó severamente a los agricultores y acabó con el Grange. Para 1880, su membresía se había reducido a 100,000 personas. Además, el Tribunal Supremo llegó a varias decisiones que afectaron los logros legislativos alcanzados por el Grange a nivel estatal.

El fin del Grange no puso fin a los problemas de los agricultores y, por ende, a su necesidad de estar organizados. Por el contrario, la década de 1880 fue testigo del surgimiento de poderosas alianzas regionales de agricultores. En el sur, los agricultores se unieron para enfrentar el descenso en los precios del algodón y fundaron la Alianza Sureña de Granjeros en 1877. A los granjeros afroamericanos del Sur se les negó acceso a la Alianza Sureña por lo que se vieron obligados a fundar, en 1886, su propia organización, la Alianza de los Granjeros de Color (“Colored Farmer´s Alliance”). En el norte fue fundada la Alianza de Agricultores Norteños, que ganó mucha fuerza en estados como Nebraska, Iowa y Minnesota. Contrario a la Granger, las alianzas dieron más importancia a la participación política. Éstas desarrollaron una visión política que buscaba no sólo defender sus intereses, sino también crear un nuevo tipo de sociedad que dejase a un lado la competencia y estuviera basada en la cooperación.A finales de la década de 1880, las crecientes frustraciones convencieron al liderato de las alianzas de la necesidad de crear un partido nacional para defender sus intereses e iniciar una renovación nacional. En 1889, las alianzas del norte y el sur decidieron cooperar.

En diciembre de 1890, celebraron una convención nacional en la Ocala, Florida y aprobaron lo que se convertiría en la plataforma de un partido político, las llamadas Exigencias de Ocala. Los delegados decidieron seguir adelante con la fundación de un tercer partido nacional que atrajese no sólo a los granjeros, sino también a las organizaciones laborales y reformistas. En febrero de 1892, 1,300 delegados de las alianzas agrícolas (incluyendo a los afro-americanos) y de un sindicato nacional conocido como los Knights of Labor se reunieron en la ciudad de San Luis, y fundaron el Partido del Pueblo o Partido Populista.

Miembros del Partido Populista, Nebraska, 1892

El programa del nuevo partido era muy ambicioso, ya que proponía la nacionalización de la banca, los ferrocarriles y los telégrafos, la prohibición de latifundios de propiedad absentista, la elección directa de los senadores federales, la creación de un impuesto gradual a los ingresos, el establecimiento de la jornada laboral de ocho horas y la restricción de la inmigración. Los populistas, como fueron llamados los seguidores de este nuevo partido político, querían que el gobierno federal construyera almacenes donde pudieron ser depositados las cosechas hasta que sus precios mejorasen y que concediera préstamos a muy bajo interés a los agricultores para que pudieran sobrevivir la espera de mejores precios.

Los populistas participaron en las elecciones de 1892, obteniendo victorias en Idaho, Nevada, Kansas y Dakota del Norte. A nivel nacional, eligieron tres gobernadores, diez representantes y cinco senadores. Su candidato a la presidencia, James B. Weaver, recibió 1,000,000 de votos y acumuló 22 votos electorales. Aunque Partido del Pueblo demostró muy poca fuerza en los centros urbanos del este, es incuestionable que hizo una gran demostración política, sobre todo, si tomamos en cuenta que era un partido de menos de un año de vida.

En las elecciones de 1896, los populistas se enfrentaron un gran dilema, pues el candidato del Partido Demócrata, William Jennings Bryan, tenía un discurso muy cercano al del Partido Populista y, por ende, se ganó el apoyo de un buen número de agricultores. Temerosos de que Bryan les debilitara, los populistas decidieron nominarle como su candidato a la presidencia, pero rechazaron una fusión o alianza con el Partido Demócrata. Por su parte, los republicanos nominaron a un veterano de la guerra civil llamado William McKinley. Éste recibió el apoyo de los grandes intereses económicos (la banca, la industria y los ferrocarriles) y ganó las elecciones con el 51% del voto popular y 271 votos electorales. Bryan obtuvo 6,492,449 votos populares y 176 votos electorales. La victoria del Partido Republicano desilusionó a los populistas y debilitó al partido, que comenzó a disolverse rápidamente.

A lo largo del siglo XX, y lo que va del XXI, el bipartidismo ha sido la norma, excepto por la aparición temporal de terceros partidos que trataron, sin éxito, retar el control tradicional de republicanos y demócratas. Veamos algunos de ellos.

  • Partido Socialista: En 1900 fue fundado el Partido Social Demócrata, mejor conocido por el Partido Socialista. Los socialistas proponían hacerle cambios a la estructura económica del país, pero estaban divididos en torno a cuáles debían ser esos cambios. Los más radicales planteaban la eliminación del capitalismo, otros proponían reformas para reducir el poder de las empresas privadas. Bajo el liderato de Eugene Debs, este partido se convirtió en una fuerza importante, pero no en una amenaza seria para los partidos principales. En las elecciones de 1912 Debs obtuvo cerca de un millón de votos procedentes de las zonas urbanas de inmigrantes, sobre todo, alemanes y judíos.
  • Partido Progresista: En 1912, diferencias políticas entre el entonces Presidente Willliam H. Taft y el ex Presidente Teodoro Roosevelt llevaron a este último a abandonar el Partido Republicano y fundar un nuevo partido, el Progresista. En su campaña presidencial Roosevelt prometió un Nuevo Nacionalismo para el pueblo estadounidense caracterizado por un aumento del poder del gobierno federal, con más planificación y regulación para defender al pueblo de los intereses privados. La división de los republicanos facilitó la victoria del candidato demócrata Woodrow Wilson.
  • Partido Verde: En agosto de 1984 un grupo de organizaciones ecologistas se reunieron en San Paul, Minnesota, y dieron vida a la primera organización nacional verde en los Estados Unidos, los Comités Verdes de Correspondencia. Con ello buscaban darle una carácter político a su lucha ecológica. A nivel estatal fueron organizados varios partidos ecologistas locales hasta que en 1996 se organizó un partido ecologista nacional, el Partido Verde. Este es una especie de confederación de partidos ecologistas locales que busca la protección del medioambiente y la creación de una sociedad más justa y democrática. Los verdes rechazan el control que, según ellos, las grandes corporaciones tienen de la política norteamericana y aspiran a una democracia popular. En el año 2000 el Partido Verde ganó notoriedad al nominar a Ralph Nader su candidato a la presidencia. Nader es un activista y abogado que por años se han enfrentado a las grandes corporaciones en defensa de los consumidores y el medio ambiente. En las elecciones del 2000 Nader no acumuló votos electorales, pero sí obtuvo 2,888,955 votos o el 2.74 de los votos a nivel nacional. Para algunos analistas, la candidatura de Nader pudo haber ayudado a la victoria del candidato republicano George W. Bush en la elección presidencial más cerrada de la historia estadounidense, ya que le restó votos a Albert Gore, candidato demócrata. Este fue un factor especialmente importante en Florida donde Bush y Gore terminaron empate, mientas Nader obtuvo 97,419 votos. En el año 2008, el Partido Verde hizo historia altener dos mujeres como candidatas a la presidencia y vicepresidencia de los Estados Unidos. La legisladora afroamericana Cynthia McKinney fue la candidata verde a la presidencia, mientras que la activista comunitaria de origen puertorriqueño Rosa Clemente fue la candidata a la vicepresidencia. McKinney sólo recibió unos 160,000 votos. o
  • Partido Reformista: En las elecciones de 1992 se presentaron tres candidatos a la presidencia: el entonces Presidente George H. W. Bush por el Partido Republicano, el gobernador del estado de Arkansas William J. Clinton por el Partido Demócrata y un multimillonario de Texas llamado Ross Perot. Este último se presentó como candidato del Partido Reformista, fundado por él en 1995, y gastó $60 millones de su fortuna en un esfuerzo para llegar a la Casa Blanca. La campaña electoral de Perot estuvo basada en su imagen de empresario exitoso. Según éste, su conocimiento del mundo de los negocios le capacitaba para resolver los problemas económicos del país. El día de la elección Clinton obtuvo 43,728,275 votos, Bush 38,167,416 y Perot un impresionante total de 19,237,247 votos.
  • Partido del Té: Uno de los fenómenos más interesantes de la política estadounidense de principios del siglo XXI es el surgimiento del Tea Party (Partido del Te). Producto de las protestas populares en contra del rescate económico de la administración de George W. Bush y de las políticas instauradas por Barack Obama a su llegada a la Casa Blanca, el Tea Party toma su nombre de uno de los eventos más importantes en la etapa previa al inicio de la guerra de independencia de los Estados Unidos. Sus miembros se oponen al incremento de los impuestos, la expansión del gobierno federal, la creación de un seguro de salud nacional, el déficit presupuestario, etc.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, 10 de mayo de 2012

Read Full Post »