Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts Tagged ‘Bill Clinton’

by Jeremy Kuzmarov

October 10, 2013
 

A U.S. Marine helicopter (a Huey, not a Black Hawk) over Mogadishu in 1992. Photo credit: Wiki Commons.

Last week marked the twentieth anniversary of the infamous Black Hawk Down incident where Somali militia fighters loyal to Mohammed Farah Aidid shot down two American helicopters using rocket-propelled grenades. Mobs then hacked the fallen pilots to death with machetes and dragged their mutilated bodies through the streets as trophies. To mark the anniversary, 60 Minutes aired a segment focused on efforts by two private American security contractors to recover remnants of the helicopter that had been shot down, while interviewing retired Special Forces operative who had survived the ordeal.

Like much mainstream media coverage of U.S. foreign policy, the program memorialized the deaths only of the Americans killed in the fighting. While the death of those young men was indeed tragic, what went unreported is the fact that the militia fighters who shot down the Black Hawk helicopters had been previously attacked and family members had been killed by U.S. forces. In rescue operations, American helicopter gunners and Special Forces fired into crowds, killing and wounding hundreds of Somalis, a third of them women and children, compared to eighteen American dead. Bill Clinton commented: “When people kill us, they should be killed in greater numbers.”

American military intervention in Somalia was officially designed to establish a “secure environment for the delivery of humanitarian relief” after clan warfare erupted following the overthrow of dictator Siad Barre. Unbeknownst to most Americans, the United States had helped to create the conditions that produced unrest, flooding the country with weaponry during the Cold War along with the Soviets. In 1988, Barre’s legions leveled the northern city of Hargeisa and killed 60,000 in an effort to suppress an Isaaq clan based rebellion. The U.S. assisted Barre with intelligence and shipped 1,200 M-16 assault rifles and 2.8 million rounds of ammunition, having provided over $1 billion in aid since his ascension in 1969. Pointing to the strategic interests driving U.S. policy, General Norman Schwarzkopf noted that The Red Sea, with the Suez Canal in the North and the Bab-el-Madeb in the South, is one of the most vital sea lines of communication and a critical shipping link between our Pacific and European allies.”

After Barre’s ouster, the opposition split into two factions, one led by Aidid, the former army chief of staff trained under American police programs. Africa Watch reported that the warring parties engaged in “wanton and indiscriminate attacks on civilians,” producing conditions of famine. On December 9, 1992, as the TV networks broadcast harrowing images of emaciated children, the lame-duck Bush administration launched Operation Restore Hope, in which 28,000 U.S. forces stormed Mogadishu in what Le Monde described as “the most media-saturated landing in military history.” Lives were likely saved, though food had already begun to get through by this time and relief specialist Fred Cuny noted a smaller operation in the famine triangle away from Mogadishu would have been more effective.

U.S.-U.N. forces were commanded by Admiral Jonathan Howe, a key figure in the capture of Manuel Noriega and William Garrison, a cigar chomping Texan with twenty-five years experience in unconventional warfare. Charging Gen. Aidid with war crimes for interfering with their mission, they bombed radio Mogadishu, possibly to prevent announcement of a peace deal between the clans. Pakistani soldiers subsequently fired on demonstrators, prompting counter-attacks by Aidid’s militias who killed 24 of them. The U.N. Security Council then authorized “all necessary measures to apprehend those responsible.” The U.S.-U.N. placed a $25,000 bounty on Aidid’s head and engaged in manhunt operations which culminated in the Black Hawk Down incident. War crimes were committed by American, Belgian, Canadian and French forces, who tortured prisoners, raped women, destroyed cultural symbols and shot missiles into clan elder meetings, a marketplace and the main hospital in Mogadishu. Americans taking the lead in fighting operations did not know enough about Somalia to “write a high-school paper about it,” according to journalist Mark Bowden. “Their experience of battle, unlike that of any other generation of American soldiers was colored by action movies. They remarked again and again how much they felt like they were in a movie, and had to remind themselves that this horror, the blood, the death, was real.”

As political scientist David Gibbs has pointed out, American envoy Robert Oakley had close relations with the Continental Oil Company (Conoco) which provided military intelligence and helped plan the logistics for the Marine landing. Its corporate compound was transformed into a defacto U.S. embassy. The Los Angeles Times reported that “industry sources said that the companies holding the Somali exploration rights are hoping that the Bush administration’s decision to send U.S. troops will also help protect their multimillion dollar investments there.” Early in the operation, Conoco made an agreement with Aidid that it would back him if he would grant Conoco exclusive rights to oil exploration. Aidid however did not want to barter away Somali resources, demanding large concessions, and so Conoco switched to backing rival Ali Mahdi. American foreign policy followed suit. Aidid subsequently urged his supporters to “turn against the Americans” and began waging urban guerilla warfare. Journalist Scott Peterson notes that the U.S. essentially handed Aidid the patriotic mantle of the Mad Mullah (Mohammed Abdullah Hassan), a nineteenth-century nationalist who had mobilized support against Italian and British occupiers.

The Black Hawk Down incident should provide a cautionary tale about military intervention and its often destructive consequences. Unfortunately, the public remains misinformed about U.S. foreign policy, in good part because they rely for information on TV shows like 60 Minutes which fail to dig beneath the surface to uncover the hidden motives driving U.S. intervention or analyze its effect on the subject population.

Jeremy Kuzmarov is J.P. Walker assistant professor of history at the University of Tulsa and author of Modernizing Repression: Police Training and Nation Building in the American Century (Massachusetts, 2012).

– See more at: http://hnn.us/article/153561#sthash.tFKAucYo.dpuf

Read Full Post »

En un artículo publicado recientemente en la revista The American Conservative titulado “How we became Israel”, el historiador norteamericano Andrew Bacevich examina la israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos. El término no es mío, sino del propio Bacevich, y hace referencia al alegado creciente uso por Estados Unidos de tácticas y estrategias practicadas por el estado de Israel. Bacevich no es un autor ajeno a este blog, ya  que he reseñado varios de sus escritos porque le considero uno de los analistas más honestos y, por ende, valientes de la política exterior de su país. En el contexto de un posible ataque israelí contra Irán –que arrastraría a los Estados Unidos a una guerra innecesaria y muy peligrosa– me parece necesario reseñar este artículo, ya que analiza elementos muy importantes de las actuales relaciones israelíes-norteamericanas.

Bacevich comienza su artículo  con una reflexión sobre la paz y la violencia. Según éste,  la paz tiene significados que varían de acuerdo con el país o gobierno que los defina. Para unos, la paz es sinónimo de armonía basada en la tolerancia y el respeto. Para otros, no es más que un eufemismo para dominar. Un país comprometido con la paz recurre a la violencia como último recurso y esa había sido, según Bacevich, la actitud histórica de los Estados Unidos. Por el contrario, si un país ve la paz como sinónimo de dominio, hará un uso menos limitado de la violencia Ese es el caso de Israel desde hace mucho tiempo y lo que le preocupa al autor es que, según él,  desde fines de la guerra fría también ha sido la actitud de los Estados Unidos.  De acuerdo con Bacevich:

“As a consequence, U.S. national-security policy increasingly conforms to patterns of behavior pioneered by the Jewish state. This “Israelification” of U.S. policy may prove beneficial for Israel. Based on the available evidence, it’s not likely to be good for the United States.”

Es claro que para Bacevich la llamada israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos no es buen negocio para su nación. El autor le dedica el resto de su artículo a analizar este fenómeno.

Como parte de su análisis, el autor hace una serie de observaciones muy críticas y pertinentes sobre Israel. Comienza  examinando la visión sobre la paz del actual primer ministro israelí, partiendo de unas expresiones hechas por Benjamin Netanyahu en 2009, reclamando la total desmilitarización de la franja de Gaza y de la margen occidental del río Jordán como requisitos para un acuerdo de paz con los palestinos. Para Bacevich, estas exigencias no tienen sentido alguno porque los palestinos pueden ser una molestia para Israel, pero no constituyen una amenaza dada la enorme superioridad militar de los israelíes, cosa que se suele olvidar, añadiría yo, con demasiada facilidad y frecuencia. Bacevich concluye que para los israelíes la paz se deriva de la seguridad absoluta, basada no en la ventaja sino en la supremacía militar.

La insistencia en esa supremacía ha hecho necesario que Israel lleve a cabo lo que el autor denomina como “anticipatory action”, es decir, acciones preventivas contra lo que los israelíes han percibido como amenazas (“perceived threats”). Uno de los ejemplos que hace referencia el autor es el ataque israelí contra las facilidades nucleares iraquíes en 1981.  Sin embargo, con estas acciones los israelíes no se han limitado a defenderse, sino que  convirtieron la percepción de amenaza en oportunidad de expansión territorial. Bacevich da como ejemplos los ataques israelíes contra Egipto en 1956 y 1967 que, según él, no ocurrieron porque los egipcios tuvieran la capacidad de destruir a Israel. Tales ataques se dieron porque abrían la oportunidad de la ganancia territorial por vía de la conquista. Ganancia que en el caso de la guerra de 1967 ha tenido serias consecuencias estratégicas para Israel.

Bacevich examina otro elemento clave de la política de seguridad israelí: los asesinatos selectivos (“targeted assassinations”).  Los israelíes  han convertido la eliminación física de sus adversarios ­­–a través del uso del terrorismo, añadiría yo– en el sello distintivo del arte de la guerra israelí, eclipsando así métodos militares convencionales y dañando la imagen internacional de Israel.

Lo que  Bacevich no entiende y le preocupa, es por qué Estados Unidos han optado por seguir los pasos de Israel. Según éste, desde la administración del primer Bush, su país ha oscilado hacia la búsqueda del dominio militar global, hacia el uso de acciones militares preventivas y hacia a los asesinatos selectivos (en referencia al uso de vehículos aéreos no tripulados ­­–los llamados “drones”-  como arma antiterrorista creciente). Todo ello justificado, como en el caso de Israel,  como medida defensiva y como herramienta de seguridad nacional. Al autor se la hace difícil entender esta israelificación porque contrario a Israel, Estados Unidos es un país grande, con una gran población y sin enemigos  cercanos. En otras palabras, los norteamericanos tienen opciones y ventajas que los israelíes no poseen. A pesar de ello, Estados Unidos ha sucumbido “into an Israeli-like condition of perpetual war, with peace increasingly tied to unrealistic expectations of adversaries and would-be adversaries acquiescing in Washington’s will.”

Para Bacevich, este proceso de israelificación comenzó con la Operación Tormenta del Desierto, un conflicto tan rápido e impactante como la guerra de los siete días. Clinton contribuyó a este proceso con  intervenciones militares frecuentes (Haití, Bosnia, Serbia, Sudán, etc.). El segundo Bush –fiel creyente de la estrategia del “ Full Spectrum Dominance” (Dominación de espectro completo)– se embarcó en la liberación y transformación del mundo islámico. Bajo su liderato, Estados Unidos hizo, como Israel, uso de la guerra preventiva. De acuerdo con el autor, invadir Irak era visto por Bush y su gente como un acción preventiva contra lo que se percibía como una amenaza, pero también como  una oportunidad. Al atacar a Saddam Hussein, Bush no adoptó el concepto  de disuasión (“deterrence”) de la guerra fría, sino la versión israelí. La estrategia de “deterrence” de la guerra fría buscaba disuadir al oponente de llevar a cabo acciones bélicas mientras que la versión israelí está fundamentada en el uso desproporcionado de la fuerza. A los israelíes no les basta con amedrentar y han dejado atrás el bíblico ojo por ojo. Para ellos es necesario castigar desproporcionadamente para enviar una mensaje  de fuerza a sus enemigos. Basta recordar los 1,397 palestinos muertos en Gaza durante las tres semanas que duró la Operación Plomo Fundido a finales de 2008 y principios de 2009. De ellos, 345 eran menores de edad. [Según B’TSELEMThe Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories–, entre setiembre de 2000 y setiembre de 2012, las fuerzas de seguridad israelíes mataron a 6,500 palestinos en los territorios ocupados y a 69 en Israel. Durante ese mismo periodo, los palestinos asesinaron a 754 civiles y 343 miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad israelíes.]

De acuerdo con Bacevich, el objetivo de la administración Bush al invadir Irak era también enviar un mensaje: esto le puede pasar a quienes reten la voluntad de Estados Unidos. Desafortunadamente para Bush, la invasión y ocupación de Irak resultó un fracaso similar a la invasión israelí del Líbano en 1982.

El proceso de israelificación analizado por Bacevich tomó una nuevo giró bajo la presidencia de Obama, quien transformó el uso de los drones para asesinatos selectivos en la pieza clave de la política de seguridad nacional de Estados Unidos.

Bacevich concluye que, a pesar de que no favorece los intereses de Estados Unidos, el proceso de israelificación de la política de seguridad nacional estadounidense ya se ha completado, y que será muy difícil revertirlo dado el clima político reinante en la nación norteamericana.

Lo primero que debo señalar es que el uso del asesinato selectivo por el gobierno estadounidense como arma política no comenzó con los drones. Basta recordar los hallazgos del famoso Comité Church que en la década de 1970 investigó las actividades del aparato de inteligencia norteamericano en el Tercer Mundo. En un informe de catorce volúmenes, este comité legislativo documentó las actividades ilegales llevadas a cabo por la CIA, entre ellas, el asesinato e intento de asesinato de líderes del Tercer Mundo. ¿Cuántas veces ha intentado la CIA matar a Fidel Castro? ¿Cuántos miembros del Vietcong fueron capturados, torturados y asesinados por la CIA y sus asociados a través del Programa Phoenix en los años 1960? Lo que han hecho los drones es transformar la eliminación física de los enemigos  de Estados Unidos en un proceso a control remoto y, por ende, “seguro” para los estadounidenses.

A pesar estas críticas, considero que este ensayo es valioso por varias razones. Primero, porque refleja la creciente preocupación entre sectores académicos, militares y gubernamentales norteamericanos por la enorme influencia que ejerce Israel sobre la política exterior y doméstica de los Estados Unidos. Afortunadamente, no todos los estadounidenses creen que Estados Unidos debe apoyar a Israel incondicionalmente, especialmente, cuando es claro que tal apoyo tiene un gran costo político y económico para Estados Unidos. Segundo, porque desarrollar una discusión pública y abierta de este tema es extremadamente necesario para contrarrestar la influencia del “lobby” pro-israelí en los Estados Unidos (y a nivel mundial). En ese sentido, este ensayo cumple una función muy importante al criticar la política de seguridad de Israel desde una óptica  honesta. Bacevich no teme llamar las cosas por su nombre y no duda en describir la actual política de seguridad israelí como una basada en asesinatos selectivos y el uso desproporcionado de la fuerza, y que, además, no busca la paz, sino el dominio y la expansión territorial.

Norberto Barreto Velázquez, PhD

Lima, Perú, 11 de noviembre de 2012

Read Full Post »